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Movie Review: 'Rush'

  • RUSH

Whereas Hunt is a classic, carousing, big-ego racer, Lauda is a methodical tactician. The film, based on the lives of the two famous racers, captures the climax of their collision in the 1976 world championship that came down to the final race and that also featured a crash that left Lauda's face terribly burned.

Just as "Frost/Nixon" marveled at the contrast of flashy TV newsman David Frost and the curmudgeonly Richard Nixon, "Rush" (also set in the '70s) toggles between Hunt and Lauda. Howard's film is propelled by the clash of styles that repels them from one another, even as their mutual dedication draws them closer.

Racing films often speed inevitably toward clich? of fast-paced living catching up to the men behind the wheel. "Rush" has plenty of that — the adrenaline-fueled death dance required for the checkered flag. (Hunt describes his car as "a little coffin, really, surrounded by high-octane fuel.") But it veers away toward something much sweeter: a simple ode to rivalry.

"Rush" makes for a terrific double feature with the superb 2010 documentary "Senna," about Brazilian Formula One racer Ayrton Senna, which Howard has said he studied in making "Rush." Formula One, which engenders far more passion in Europe than in the NASCAR-favored U.S., has otherwise seldom turned up in the movies. Most notably, there was the handsomely photographed "Grand Prix" (1966).

While "Rush" has plenty of exciting racing scenes as it makes pit stops through famous Formula One courses, Howard is more concerned with the personality conflict, played out at high speed.


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