Bangor Hydro Electric is advising people it will be the end of the day Friday before its more than 11,000 customers are back on line. The number has fluctuated as some people get power back while others lose it.

Central Maine Power, with more than 24,000 customers still without power early Thursday, hoped to get electricity back for most by the end of the day but acknowledged that some will still be without electricity on Friday. More than 100,000 were without power at the storm's peak.

In the snow country of New York's Tug Hill Plateau, east of Lake Ontario, 11 to 17 inches of wind-whipped lake effect snow was expected to fall by the end of the day Friday. The ice storm knocked out electricity for about 50,000 customers in northern New York; all but a handful had power back by Thursday.

Ashley Walter, 27, was hunkered down Wednesday with her husband, Jacob, and their month-old daughter, Leah, at a shelter set up in a school in Litchfield, Maine. The family lost power Saturday, got it back temporarily, then lost it again Sunday.

Despite the challenge of being out of the house, especially at Christmas, the family was staying positive.

"It's definitely kind of strange but we're hanging in there," Ashley Walter said Wednesday. "We did our Christmas together last night. I packed little stockings and gave them to my husband, sisters and my daughter."

In Michigan, CMS Energy Corp. said some of its nearly 90,000 customers still offline may have to wait until Saturday to get power back.

With no electricity at their home, Jill Ghantous and her family from Swartz Creek, Mich., opened their Christmas presents at a hotel in Genesee County's Grand Blanc Township, southeast of Flint.

The family members took the Christmas stockings from their home and hung them from a dresser in the hotel room. They also bought a small tree for the room, said Ghantous, whose children are 10 and 6.

"I guess we can kind of pull Christmas out of nothing," Ghantous told "You just get resourceful and try to make it the best you can."

Authorities blame the storm for 27 deaths; 17 in the U.S. and 10 in Canada, including five who apparently died from carbon monoxide poisoning.


Associated Press writers David Goodman in Detroit and Rik Stevens in Concord, N.H., contributed to this report.