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Cepeda: Ring the school bell all year long

It's mid-August and parents across the country are breathing a sigh of relief that their tours of duty as surrogate educators finally will end.

It's a burden that many parents bear because they know that the only effective prevention against what's commonly known as "summer learning loss" — the erosion of academic skills, particularly in reading and math, that happens when kids veg out all summer — is to keep kids actively engaged in mind-sharpening recreation. Yet it is mostly those parents who are middle-class or wealthy who can plow money into making this happen.

For children whose parents can afford it, there really isn't the kind of lazy, relaxed summer you and I might remember from our childhoods — back when getting into a good college was not a goal set at birth. Kids from families with resources effectively go to school year-round because their summers are filled to the brim with enrichment activities.

This year, with one son going into the treacherous, teachers-take-the-gloves-off seventh grade and my oldest entering the college-prep track at our public high school, "summer" at my house has been a whirlwind of activity.

There were multiple book-reading projects, crafts for rainy days, a few week-long day camps for each boy and some half-day activities — archery, Lego engineering, leadership skills — plus a month-long academic institute for our soon-to-be-freshman, not to mention the year-round commitments to boxing classes and music lessons.

Oh, and we went on a family vacation specifically chosen to expose the boys to a part of the country they'd previously only read about in textbooks. This on top of our regular summer trips to visit extended family and enjoy local cultural events.

It was wonderful, but though the kids were near home and not in elite, private sleep-away camps, it was still pricey. Even though we bought used books, took advantage of discounted resident-only rates at our local school, park district and community college, used frequent-flier miles and clipped many coupons, it was a stretch.

Not to mention exhausting. My husband, a teacher on summer "vacation," had a day where, between ferrying one kid here and another there, he spent almost six hours in the car.

These aren't complaints but, rather, an illustration of the crucial, little-talked-about, months-long experience that helps drive the academic achievement gap between the haves and the have-nots: summer vacation.

It's the time when parents who aren't lucky enough to be home during summer — or can't afford to provide learning experiences for their kids — spend what little energy they have just making sure their kids get fed during the day and hoping they stay safe.


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