59°
Partly cloudy
SUN
 66°
 51°
MON
 66°
 45°
TUE
 67°
 44°
WED
 60°
 46°
THU
 61°
 41°

House votes to replace 'No Child' law

  • Members of the House of Representatives leave the Capitol for the weekend after the Republican majority passed legislation to replace the No Child Left Behind law, in Washington, Friday, July 19, 2013. The Student Success Act reflects the long-held Republican premise that Washington has no business determining how local school systems are run. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

WASHINGTON — House Republicans voted Friday to dismantle the troubled No Child Left Behind law for evaluating America's students and schools, saying states and local school districts rather than Washington should be setting rules for ensuring that kids are getting good educations.

The legislation would eliminate federally required testing of students, which has been controversial from the start. But the measure passed with no Democratic support and drew a veto threat from the Obama administration, which said it would be a "step backward" in efforts to better prepare children for colleges and careers and to bring improvements to low-performing schools.

Democrats in the Senate, where they hold the majority, are working on their own bill. It would also give states greater flexibility in designing school improvement standards. But it would maintain the authority of the federal education secretary to approve those plans. A Senate vote on that legislation is unlikely until autumn.

The House bill, which Republicans named the Student Success Act and Democrats dubbed the Letting Students Down Act, passed 221-207, with every Democrat, and 12 Republicans voting against it.

That partisanship comes against a background in which nearly everyone agrees that No Child Left Behind, while achieving some successes in improving achievement levels, is too inflexible and needs a major overhaul.


© The Press Democrat |  Terms of Service |  Privacy Policy |  Jobs With Us |  RSS |  Advertising |  Sonoma Media Investments |  Place an Ad
Switch to our Mobile View