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Art and nature at Quarry Hill

  • Cazadero artist Bruce's Johnson sculpture entitled "Uprising" at the Quarry Hill Botanical Garden in Glen Ellen. (Photo by Vi Bottaro, 2014)

When you plunk down massive sculptures amid the flora and fauna of a wild garden, it’s inevitable that some kind of critter will move in.

But that doesn’t bother Sonoma County sculptor Bruce Johnson, who installed six of his rugged redwood works at Quarryhill Botanical Garden in Glen Ellen this spring as the first of a series of art exhibits that will recur annually at the rustic, woodland preserve.

Johnson said he anticipated an insect incursion when creating his sculpture, “Five Elements,” which he designed for a competition in Japan.

“There is a bee door for a beehive,” said Johnson of the work, which blends the geolithic stackings of Stonehenge with the architectural form of a Japanese lantern.

Johnson’s sculptures, which are subtly Asian in feeling and form, provide an elegant foil for the Quarryhill garden, which features 20,000 rare, endangered and wild-origin plants grown from seed gathered all over East Asia, from China to Japan.

“Many of these plants are on the verge of extinction, and people look at this garden as a Noah’s Ark of species,” said Bill McNamara, director of Quarryhill. “We distribute the seeds to botanical gardens around the world.”

In staging the exhibit, Johnson enlisted the help of Bionic, a San Francisco landscape architecture firm experienced with collaborating with artists.

Bionic curated the show and placed the sculptures without significantly altering the natural setting of the garden.

While the Quarryhill property totals 62 acres — including 16 acres of organic cabernet sauvignon vineyards — the wild garden rambles over 25 acres, roughly in the shape of a rectangle. The six sculptures are clustered together along a route that takes about 15 minutes to walk.

“The landscape architect asked, ‘How do you organize a show in the garden?’ ” Johnson said. “We looked for unique sites with different characteristics, geometry or gestures.”


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