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Chardonnay is a malleable grape, one that should be free of fingerprints.

That’s according to Bo Felton of Migration Wines.

“I often feel like it’s my job to protect the grapes that show up on the back of the truck,” Felton said.

“You need to trust the quality of the vineyards, the work of the growers and the quality of the fruit,” Felton added.

Felton is the winemaker behind our wine-of-the-week — the Migration, 2012 Russian River Valley Chardonnay at $32.

It’s a layered chardonnay with aromas and flavors of pear, honeysuckle and crème brulee. Rich and complex, the chardonnay still manages to be vibrant. It has a lush texture and nice length.

The wine is balanced, which is crucial, Felton said.

“The quality of the fruit was so great in 2012 it was almost an embarrassment of riches,” Felton said. “The trick was finding that ideal balance between the elements.”

Chardonnay, Felton said, is a winemaker’s wine.

“It can be gently shaped to accentuate certain characteristics, but this is a delicate balancing act,” he said.

“You also have to be very respectful,” Felton added, “to maintain the qualities that drew you to the vineyards in the first place.”

One thing the uninitiated don’t know about chardonnay, Felton said, is how picking decisions play to complexity.

“When to pick is a huge decision, and we make these decisions based on the individual vineyards, blocks, and sometimes even rows,” Felton said. “You can build complexity by picking some grapes a little earlier, and others a bit later.”

Felton was raised in Colorado and he was introduced to wine by his grandfather, who was an avid home winemaker.

“Each vintage, after he’d driven a van full of grapes from California to Colorado, my family would help de-stem the fruit by hand and ultimately help turn it into wine,” Felton said.

“These early experiences left me with a fascination for wine,” Felton added.

Wine writer Peg Melnik can be reached at 707-521-5310 or peg.melnik@pressdemocrat.com.

Wine of the Week: Scouting for the tastiest chardonnays.

Wine writer Peg Melnik had a blind tasting this week of chardonnays, ranging from refined to full-bodied with everything in-between. Our wine-of-the-week winner is the Migration, 2012 Russian River Valley Chardonnay at $32.

TOP PICK: Migration, 2012 Russian River Valley Chardonnay, 14.3 percent alcohol, $32. ★★★★

This chardonnay is striking, with notes of white flowers, stone fruit and lemon custard. It’s rich and has a lush texture, but it’s buoyed by its bright acid and crisp finish.

Other impressive wines

Etude, 2012 Carneros Estate Chardonnay, 14.3 percent, $32. ★★★★

This is a lovely, layered chardonnay. It has aromas and flavors of pear, apple and quince. It has great minerality and wins you over with its delicate floral notes.

Inman, 2012 Russian River Valley, Sonoma County Chardonnay, 11.6 percent, $35. ★★★★

This is an elegant chardonnay and what makes it a standout is that it’s spare. It has high-toned fruit, crisp acid and nice minerality. It’s a terrific summer white.

Chateau St. Jean, 2012 Belle Terre Vineyard, Alexander Valley Chardonnay, 14.4 percent, $25. ★★★ 1⁄2

A lush chardonnay that’s rich and smoky. Notes of pear, apple and creme brulee. Lingering finish.

Succulent-Topped Pumpkin

1 flat-topped pumpkin with a stem that has no soft spots or cuts in it

— Sanitizing wipes

— Spray adhesive craft glue and a face mask

— Sphagnum Moss (aka Green Moss)

— A Lazy Susan

— A mini warm glue gun and vinyl gloves

A chop stick to press the cuttings into place without burning your fingers

— An assortment of succulent cuttings with a variety of colors, shapes and textures including 3 large rosette-type thrillers for a large pumpkin, some branching fillers and trailing spillers.

— Tiny pine cones, fir cones, seed pots, etc. for embellishments.

— A trivet

Cut the stem of the pumpkin down to about half an inch.

Clean the pumpkin with sanitizing wipes or a 10% bleach solution on a damp rag.

When the pumpkin is dry put on the face mask and spray the top of the pumpkin with the spray craft adhesive.

Once the glue is tacky press a ½-inch pancake of green moss firmly onto the pumpkin.

Put the pumpkin on the Lazy Susan and pick out some large cuttings for the focal point.

Leaving a ½-inch stem, apply hot glue to the succulent and attach it firmly to the moss with your chopstick, holding for 3 seconds. If using 1 thriller, place it slightly off center.

Build around your thriller(s), packing the plant material in tightly to prop the larger cutting and to keep the glue from showing as the succulents become less plump as time goes by.

Add acorns, nuts, etc. as desired.

Place in a shaded cool indoor location or in a sheltered outdoor location. Place on a trivet for good air circulation beneath the pumpkin to prevent rotting.

Mist with a spray bottle and set outside occasionally in fresh air to preserve the succulents.

Handle with care, as this is a long-lasting but fragile arrangement.

When you are done with your arrangement plant your succulent cuttings and compost your pumpkin.

Four Vines, 2012 Unoaked Chardonnay, Santa Barbara County, 13.9 percent, $12. ★★★ 1⁄2

This is a crisp and clean quaffer. It has bright notes of grapefruit, lime, white peach and mineral. Light on its feet.