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Australia considers intervention in surrogate baby case (w/video)

  • Pattaramon Chanbua, right, kisses her baby boy Gammy at a hospital in Chonburi province, southeastern Thailand Sunday, Aug. 3, 2014. The Australian government is consulting Thai authorities after news emerged that Gammy, a baby with Downs Syndrome was abandoned with Chanbua, his surrogate mother, in Thailand by his Australian parents, according to local media. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)

CANBERRA, Australia — Seven-month-old Gammy, who was born with Down syndrome and a congenital heart condition, is being cared for by his young Thai surrogate mother after his Australian biological parents left him behind in Thailand, taking home only his healthy twin sister.

Now the Australian government says it is considering intervening in the case, with the country's immigration minister saying Monday that the little blond, brown-eyed boy might be entitled to Australian citizenship.

Pattaramon Chanbua, a 21-year-old food vendor who has two young children of her own, says she met the Australian couple only once, when the babies were born, and knew only that they lived in Western Australia state. The couple has not been publicly identified.

Australian Immigration Minister Scott Morrison called Pattaramon "an absolute hero" and "a saint," but said the law surrounding the case "is very, very murky."

"We are taking a close look at what can be done here, but I wouldn't want to raise any false hopes or expectations," Morrison told Sydney Radio 2GB. "We are dealing with something that has happened in another country's jurisdiction."

Morrison's office later said in a statement that "the child may be eligible for Australian citizenship," though it did not elaborate. Australian citizens are entitled to free health care in Australia.

Speaking Sunday from her Thai seaside town of Sri Racha, Pattaramon said that she was not angry with the biological parents for leaving Gammy behind, and that she hoped they would take good care of his twin sister.

"I've never felt angry at them or hated them. I'm always willing to forgive them," Pattaramon told The Associated Press. "I want to see that they love the baby girl as much as my family loves Gammy. I want her to be well taken care of."

Pattaramon was promised 300,000 baht ($9,300) by a surrogacy agency in Bangkok, Thailand's capital, to be a surrogate for the Australian couple, but says she has not been fully paid since the babies were born last December.

She said the agency knew about Gammy's condition four or five months after she became pregnant but did not tell her. It wasn't until the seventh month of her pregnancy that the doctors and the agency told her the twin boy had Down syndrome and suggested that she abort the fetus.


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