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Our Wine of the Week, J Vineyards 2015 Sonoma, Monterey, & Santa Barbara Counties Pinot Noir ($25), is lush and rich, with layers of ripe fruit flavors that border on jammy. There’s a bit of licorice root, too, and a suggestion of white peppercorns. There is a profound earthiness on the wine’s lingering finish and just a bit of heat from the 14.6 percent alcohol.

What makes this pinot noir stand out is its texture, as smooth as a silk glove moving slowly over a taffeta skirt or silk velvet quilt. It is luxuriously engaging and an signature example of something this varietal and no other can do.

The wine is perfect with risotto, especially one with wild mushrooms. It is delicious with roasted pork loin topped with fresh Bing cherries and tarragon. Rare duck breast, with or without cherries, rare rack of lamb and mushroom-bacon ragout all flatter this wine.

Blue cheeses are another great match. A simple appetizer of blue cheese, a sweet condiment such as membrillo or red onion marmalade and a few toast points makes a lovely early evening nibble.

If you want to get more elaborate, a blue cheese soufflé is not at all difficult to make and is a lovely match. Add a coin of blue cheese butter to a grilled steak or grilled portobello mushroom and you’ll just about swoon.

Today’s recipe is inspired by the eggs of spring, which are so rich and delicious that a one-egg omelet can be quite filling.

And if you read British mystery novels, you’ve probably come across the tradition of serving a sweet or slightly sweet omelet as dessert, which also inspired today’s recipe, along with the wine, of course.

This omelet is quite similar to a crepe, in that it is very thin. If you don’t have the cherry preserves recommended at the end of the recipe, use a favorite berry or cherry preserve that is not too sweet.

Dessert Omelet with Blue Cheese & Black Cherry Preserves
Serves 1, easily doubled

1-2 teaspoons best-quality butter

1 large or 2 very small local farm eggs, beaten

— Kosher salt

— black pepper in a mill

2 thin triangle wedges of blue cheese, such as Pt. Reyes Original Blue

— Generous dollop of black cherry preserves (see Note below)

Set a large (9 to 10-inch) nonstick sauté pan over medium high heat and add the butter.

When the butter is melted, swirl the pan to distribute it evenly. Tip in the egg and immediately swirl the pan again, gently, to distribute the egg in a thin layer.

When the egg is almost set, season lightly with salt and several turns of black pepper. Set one wedge of cheese, near the edge of the omelet, tip pointing inward. Using a thin metal spatula, fold the omelet in half and then in thirds, creating a triangle.

Tip onto a small plate and top with the remaining wedge of cheese. Top the cheese with the preserves and enjoy right away.

Note: K.L. Keller Foodways, based in Oakland, sells Confiture de Cerises noires, the best cherry preserves I’ve tasted, in part because they are not overloaded with too much sugar. Look for them at such stores as Oliver’s.

Michele Anna Jordan has written more than 20 books to date, including “The Good Cook’s Book of Salt & Pepper.” Email her at michele@micheleannajordan.com

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