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"They're only 1-inch tall, by now they should be well-established," said Yahnkey. If the drought continues, he expects he'll have to buy compost at a cost of $18 to $20 for a cubic yard to keep his soil rich. "Those costs add up quick."

Over at Green String Farm, it's the recent cold weather that's caused the most damage. Night after night of freezing temperatures wreaked havoc on many winter crops.

"Everything that went in (this winter) is suffering," said farm manager Misja Nuyttens. "This is the driest and the coldest I've seen it in the four years I've been here."

But, the farmers said it's not time to panic. Significant showers in January, February and March could turn the situation around quickly. "You get really scared and then you get a lot of rain all at once and you're fine," McIsaac said.

(Contact Emily Charrier at emily.charrier@arguscourier.com)