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Kristof: When Emily, a Boston ninth-grader, was sold for sex

  • This artwork by Donna Grethen relates to child predators and the World Wide Web.

BOSTON

Emily, a 15-year-old ninth-grader, ran away from home in early November, and her parents are sitting at their dining table, frightened and inconsolable.

The parents, Maria and Benjamin, both school-bus drivers, have been searching for their daughter all along and pushing the police to investigate. They gingerly confess their fears that Emily, a Latina, is being controlled by a pimp.

I'm here to try to understand the vast national problem of runaways, and I ask if they have checked Backpage.com, the leading website for prostitution and sex trafficking in America. They say they haven't heard of it. Since I've written about Backpage before and am familiar with how runaways often end up in its advertisements, I pull out my laptop — and, in two minutes, we find an ad for a "mixed Latina catering to your needs" with photos of a seminude girl.

Maria staggers and shrieks. It's Emily.

A 2002 Justice Department study suggested that more than 1.6 million American juveniles run away or are kicked out of their home each year. Ernie Allen, a former president of the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, has estimated that at least 100,000 kids are sexually trafficked each year in the United States.

Perhaps they aren't a priority because they're seen as asking for it, not as victims. This was Emily's fourth time running away, and she seems to have voluntarily connected with a pimp. Based on text messages that her family intercepted, Emily was apparently used by a pimp to recruit one of her girlfriends — a common practice.

"Made about 15 or 16 hundred," Emily boasted to her friend in one text. "Come make money with me I promise u gonna be good." So it's true that no one was holding a gun to Emily's head. Then again, she was 15, in a perilous business. And, in this case it turned out, having sex with a half-dozen men a day and handing over every penny to an armed pimp.

A bit more searching on the Web, and we find that Emily has been advertised for sex in four states: Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts and Connecticut.

The ads say that Emily (the name used in the ads, which is not her real name) is "fetish-friendly," and that's scary. Pimps use "fetish-friendly" as a dog whistle to attract deviants who will pay more for the right to be extra violent or abusive.


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