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Longtime 'SNL' announcer Don Pardo dies at 96 (w/video)

  • This March 14, 1992 photo provided by NBC shows announcer Don Pardo on the set of "Saturday Night Live." Pardo, the durable television and radio announcer whose resonant voice-over style was widely imitated and became the standard in the field, died Monday, Aug. 18, 2014 in Arizona at the age of 96. (AP Photo/NBC, Al Levine)

NEW YORK — Few would recognize his face, but most knew his voice: the booming baritone that for nearly four decades heralded "Saturday Night Live."

Don Pardo, the eras-spanning radio and TV announcer whose resonant voice-over style was celebrated for its majesty and power, died Monday in Arizona at the age of 96.

Pardo's strong jaw and leading-man smile were seldom on display, but for more than 60 years his elegant pipes graced newscasts, game shows (during the original run of "Jeopardy!," its emcee ritually called on him to "Tell 'em what they've won, Don Pardo") and especially "SNL," where he played an integral role through last season, heralding the lineup, like always, as recently as the May finale.

"There was no greater thrill than hearing Don Pardo bellow your name for the first time in the opening credits of 'Saturday Night Live,'" said long-time cast member Tina Fey. "It meant you were officially 'on television.'"

Fey described Pardo as "a sweet, sweet man," adding, "Late night will never sound as cool again."


"My whole life changed once Don Pardo said my name," echoed Amy Poehler, a fellow "SNL" alum. "I will really miss that kind and talented man."

His was no ordinary voice and he guarded it closely, with cough drops always at the ready.

"My voice is my Achilles' heel," Pardo said in a 1985 interview with The Associated Press. "When I get sick, it's always my voice." But it served him well from a tender age.

Dominick George Pardo was born in Westfield, Massachusetts, on Feb. 22, 1918, and grew up in Norwich, Connecticut.

One of his first jobs was that of ticket-taker at a local movie theater; even then, his voice was commanding.


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