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A major rescue unfolded Sunday on the section of Santa Rosa’s West Ninth Street where herons and egrets nest in the median trees.

No birds were involved. More than 20 people gave up part of their weekend to outmaneuver a young dachshund that’s dodged cars and slept in flower beds for months.

Directing the rescue mission was Shirley Zindler, an extraordinary Sonoma County Animal Control officer who’s written books and co-founded the Dogwood Animal Rescue Project.

She was blown away by all the people who answered her online call for help to capture the apparently abandoned weiner dog, known throughout the West Ninth Street neighborhood as Hank, before he gets run over or something else bad happens to him.

Using portable fencing and great patience, the humans at last corraled the little dude. Dogwood expects within a few weeks to put him for adoption.

Zindler said she’s aware that some people who work in animal welfare come to pretty much despise humans.

“The longer I do it, the more I love people,” she said. “They all gave up their Sunday morning to rescue a dog.”

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WHAT A FINE IDEA for a walking tour of downtown Santa Rosa that takes in art, food, wine and urban design that includes the new Old Courthouse Square.

Alexander Valley’s Sutro Wine Co. and several partners will launch Saturday’s Art Dinner with a private reception at the Art Museum of Sonoma County, now exhibiting the work of Franklin Williams.

Then there’s a stroll through downtown and the square, concluding just across Fourth Street with a five-course, wine-paired meal at The County Bench Kitchen & Bar.

Sixty-five bucks seems like a deal. There’s more on the Events page at sutrowine.com.

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MUCH TO PAWN-DER: What sorts of people borrow money from a pawn shop? All sorts, Marv Hyman will tell you.

“I even had Raymond Burr come in,” recalls Hyman, who in 1958 opened in a sweet spot on Santa Rosa’s Fourth Street the business that became The Pawn Advantage. “I made him two of the biggest loans I ever made.”

Burr, the late star of TV’s “Perry Mason” and “Ironsides,” was becoming a Dry Creek Valley winemaker about 40 years back and needed to raise some cash to buy property.

Marv Hyman and his son and partner, Michael, also have had folks walk in to borrow money short term by pawning gold or coins, then using the cash to buy more gold and coins. And there are all the working people who need a bit of dough to pay the rent or a bill or some other pressing expense, so they hock a guitar or a watch or who knows what until they can pay the money back.

Michael Hyman, a native of Santa Rosa and a ’78 graduate of Montgomery High, grew up working in the pawn shop and took over running it when his dad retired.

He has now sold the business, though his dad still owns the building.

Michael is involved up to his ears in civic affairs — Chop’s Teen Club, 6th Street Playhouse, Santa Rosa Homeless Collective, Downtown Action Organization — and intends to remain so.

“This is my town,” he confirms. It’s just no longer his pawn shop.

Chris Smith is at 707-521-5211 and chris.smith@pressdemocrat.com.