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Talking as they walked and glimpsed at window displays, Linda Donahue and her granddaughter, Daisy, who’s 15, savored a start-of-school shopping trek at Santa Rosa Plaza.

They were on the ground level, with Sears behind them and Macy’s ahead. Both stopped short as a distressed young woman emerged from a shop.

It appeared to Linda that she was hyperventilating and “had kind of a wild look in her eyes.” A second young woman stepped briskly after the first, and tried to comfort her.

Some people would have looked away or distanced themselves from the emotional scene. Linda obviously is not wired that way. Many times before she retired in 2008 as the longtime office secretary at west Marin’s Bolinas-Stinson School, she came to the aid of kids who were hurt or upset.

She approached the two young women and asked, “Should we call 911?”

Neither answered at once. Linda decided the call should be made and reached into her purse for her phone.

Then someone shouted “Cut!”

The anguished look lifted from the young woman’s face and people appeared whom Linda and Daisy quickly realized were members of a camera crew. Daisy spotted an actor in “13 Reasons Why,” the hit series now in its second season that Paramount TV and Netflix has shot at Analy High School in Sebastopol and all around the Bay Area.

Linda was equally amazed and relieved, and how pleased when a fellow looking to be in charge on the location set stepped up to say, “I have to tell you, if I ever get in a situation where 911 is needing to be called, I hope you’re there!”

Before she and Daisy resumed their retail excursion, Linda asked another crew member if she might see herself in the production.

You will, she was told, if you can get your hands on the bloopers reel.

DENNY MARTIN, the widely beloved late Fetzer Vineyards winemaker and mentor, has been bestowed a lasting and potentially life-changing tribute.

A scholarship for students of wine and winemaking was created in his name by the American Society for Enology and Viticulture. Martin, who died Aug. 13 at 69, had been a director and president of the group.

Anyone can honor him by contributing to the Dennis Martin Scholarship Fund at ASEV, P.O. Box 1855, Davis, CA 95617-1855.

THE POW/MIA CROSS that Breck Parkman found in a parking lot at the Kaiser Permanente Santa Rosa Medical Center was of little monetary value even before it was run over.

Still, Parkman wonders if the person who owned the memorial cross might have worn it in tribute to someone lost while serving the country.

Parkman wonders if the rightful owner of the silver-plated POW/MIA pin might like to have it back. If so, that person can contact me, and I’ll contact Parkman.

IRMA BERTOZZI is the name on the simple baby’s quilt that Sally Pyne found on Bodega Avenue near Petaluma.

The blanket wouldn’t trigger an eBay bidding war. But, as with Brent Parkman and the pin, Pyne imagines that perhaps there’s someone terribly sorry to have lost it.

Let me know if it’s you.

Chris Smith is at 707-521-5211 and chris.smith@pressdemocrat.com.

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