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Humans and climate

EDITOR: I learned about man’s impact on the weather in my high school ecology class in 1968. Mr. Bethell (Rick the Stick as the students called him) showed us the increase in atmospheric carbon and the increase since the industrial revolution. Not surprising, the curve and Earth’s humanoid population were an exact match. This was fact, long before the topic of global warming became political.

He also told us that if we weren’t part of the solution, we were part of the problem. I know this affected me; our family is far from perfect, but we drive hybrid cars, have an EV system and limited our family to two children.

I put Donald Trump’s denial of man’s impact alongside flat-Earth theory, the idea that everything on Earth was created as it is — all at once — and that cigarette smoking hasn’t been shown to cause cancer. Whether he acknowledges man’s impact doesn’t change our ability to choose what we drive or how we live or our ability to make a difference. What he believes, whether from greed or ignorance, should not affect anyone’s choice to be part of the solution, not part of the problem.

KAREN NORMAN-BOUDREAU

Sebastopol

Rental rules

EDITOR: So let me get this straight (“Tweaking rules to ease widening rental crunch,” Sunday). I find myself with a home that has an extra room in it. Maybe an in-law unit, maybe a spare bedroom. I’m a social creature and like meeting people from different areas and countries, but I also like my privacy and don’t want a permanent tenant. The ideal solution for me is to rent the space for short term stays.

But wait. The government in its infinite wisdom knows what I should be doing with my property and has decided that I can’t do that, that I instead should rent my extra space on a permanent basis. But I don’t want to do that. So the space is empty, benefiting no one.

Anyone who thinks California is the land of the free is not a property owner.

LESLEY BRABYN

Bodega

Dealing with bullies

EDITOR: Regarding Saturday’s article about a 14-year-old boy being arrested (“Teen boy arrested in school gun threat”), there is no question on my part that he should have been arrested. But Michael Kellison, the superintendent of the Oak Grove School District, gave no assurance that the incidents that prompted the boy’s response — the bullying of the boy at Willowside Middle School — had in any way been dealt with. That’s not very encouraging.

Kellison “stressed that students were never in any danger Friday,” the article said. Apparently, the 14-year-old boy felt that previously he was in enough danger “that he threatened to bring a gun to school and shoot classmates who were bullying him.”

It seems to me that the bullying needs to be dealt with. In no way did the 14-year-old do the right thing, but up until his threat, he was the victim here.

ED SHOOP

Sonoma

Korean rapprochement

EDITOR: Although I understand the desire of many South Korea citizens to normalize relations with North Korea, I’m afraid it will never happen (“S Korea may reset relations,” Saturday). The U.S. will never allow a political and diplomatic rapprochement between these countries.

Indeed, what the Pentagon fears more than any war is peace. Peace would upset Washington’s long-standing goal of maintaining military hegemony in the region as a means to confront China. Peace would mean the end of stationing 28,500 military personnel in the area under the guise of protecting an ally, which in turn would mean a decrease in the defense budget. Peace would mean South Korea would no longer be coerced into purchasing expensive U.S.-made weapons systems.

If progressive Moon Jae-in wins the next election and tries to establish friendlier ties to North Korea, I’m confident his tenure will be rather short. As the world knows, the U.S. has a long and sordid history of overthrowing disobedient governments. It’s as simple as choosing either a people’s “color revolution,” a military coup or assassination to accomplish the desired result.

The U.S. and South Korea agreed to a military alliance in 1953. They referred to this as “the relationship forged in blood.” Any South Korean candidate who tries to deviate from this alliance will undoubtedly bring new meaning to this saying.

STEVE BAKER

Santa Rosa

Trump and Russia

EDITOR: The “collusion” paragraph in Charles Krauthammer’s Saturday column (“Heading down the conspiracy rabbit hole”) said that there is zero evidence of Donald Trump colluding with Russia, yet he casts suspicion nonetheless based on other actions by Trump associates. He questions a need for a special prosecutor and asks, “What is there to prosecute?”

Having Russia interfere with our democracy is a very serious matter. Krauthammer is wrong to suggest issuing the administration a free pass. This whole affair can be at least partially demystified by the release of Trump’s tax returns and business records.

JERRY GLADSTONE

Santa Rosa