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Teen’s tormentors

EDITOR: Please follow up on the article about the 14-year-old boy who was bullied and then arrested after threatening those who bullied him (“Teen boy arrested in school gun threat,” Saturday). Tell the public what has happened to the classmates who bullied him and what the school is doing about it. Tell the public what kind of help is being offered to this child who is suffering emotional pain. He doesn’t sound to me like someone who belongs in juvenile hall.

JANICE LEE

Petaluma

Steyer’s conversion

EDITOR: Californians see Tom Steyer putting enormous wealth to environmental causes (“Tom Steyer rallies county Democrats,” Feb. 25). He came out of nowhere in 2012 and became the darling of environmentalists.

Steyer made his wealth owning a hedge fund called Farallon Capital Management. According to a Washington Post article published June 9, 2014, many of his investments came from fossil fuels, mining and coal. “When he gave up his ownership of Farallon Capital Management in late 2012, Steyer directed that his personal holdings be divested only from tar sands and coal, two of the dirtiest energy sources … In late 2013, he directed that the ban be extended to natural gas and oil investments beyond those in the tar sands … Even after his departure from the hedge fund, Steyer continued to lend his name to endorsements of Farallon’s traditional funds, which still include fossil-fuel firms. … Steyer was criticized last year by pro-Keystone Republicans, who accused him of not disclosing his financial interests in the Canadian tar sands even as he talked about his moral opposition to the pipeline.”

Donating his money in a tax-deductible manner, Steyer wants to keep this part of his successful business career from the public. My question is, what else is Steyer withholding from the past as he may run for public office?

ANDREW SMITH

Santa Rosa

Health plans

EDITOR: When the Founding Fathers wrote the U.S. Constitution, they used available state constitutions as a starting point. It seems to me that a good health care plan for our country might be found in one of the many state plans.

There is a state where 98 percent of the people have health insurance: Massachusetts. Isn’t covering everyone a key objective? Why not take a look at what Massachusetts is doing? If it isn’t too expensive and if it is getting good results, then just copy it and just go back to whatever Congress does and leave us alone.

THOMAS HARVEY

Sebastopol

Sign of the times

EDITOR: Sunday’s Press Democrat article about Marin County residents objecting to mobile and permanent animal slaughter facilities in their county is a sad reflection on our times (“Livestock slaughter plan gets pushback”). Even in Marin, only a small minority of the population is vegetarian. The residents eat meat but evidently want it produced and slaughtered somewhere else. If they object to animal processing, they should logically ban importation of meat into their county. Meanwhile, they are doing their best to eliminate local vegetable production with their proposed local coastal zone plan rules that would force farmers to apply for permits merely to change what crop they are growing.

One reason I left Marin County was the feeling that it is increasingly home to the self-righteous elite, fond of rhetoric decrying inequality, but where maximum segregation and exclusion of the working class occurs. Increasingly isolated from the workers, farmers, mines and industries that produce what is needed to satisfy its profligate material consumption, Marin wants premium food, premium cars, luxury goods and luxurious lifestyles but nothing to do with the messy business of producing any of it.

Is that a sustainable model? Let’s make sure Sonoma County doesn’t go the same way.

JOHN BRABYN

Bodega

Defining the ‘harm’

EDITOR: “GOP health plan fails its basic test: Do no harm” was the headline of last Friday’s important editorial. While decrying the eventual denial of insurance and thus needed healthcare to possibly millions, the editors failed to specify the “harm” headlined. Well, lack of medical treatment for millions means death for thousands. The editorial should have specified that fact.

STAN LITTLE

The Sea Ranch

Oversized rental units

EDITOR: We live near Memorial Hospital in a neighborhood of mostly two-bedroom homes. When we moved 12 years ago, our intent was to downsize and decrease our carbon footprint. Our house is 1,100 square feet. In a neighborhood such as this, we don’t think 1,2000-square-foot granny units are appropriate (“Tweaking rules to ease widening rental crunch,” Sunday). One concept of a granny unit is to provide some additional housing but not solve the entire problem of lack of affordable housing. The look and livability of this neighborhood would drastically change with such large granny units.

MARY MICHAEL

Santa Rosa