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Crosswalk markings

EDITOR: In just over two miles on College Avenue and Fourth Street between Highway 101 and Farmers Lane, there are approximately 19 marked pedestrian crosswalks. Each crosswalk has a different combination of markings or alerts. These range from a couple of white or yellow lines to a traffic signal with “walk” indicators to overhead flashing warning signs. Some don’t even have streetlight illumination at night. There isn’t a single consistent theme in two miles.

Therefore, as cars travel at the speed limit of 35 mph, drivers must scan and try to ascertain whether there is an active crosswalk. This presents a confusing and dangerous situation for motorists and pedestrians.

In addition to the crosswalk situation, there isn’t a bike lane on this main thoroughfare.

Santa Rosa needs to work on correcting the inconsistent markings and warning method. It is imperative that traffic and pedestrians move safely and freely. The area is surrounded by schools and is a heavily traveled traffic corridor. The community would be well served by upgrading the safety features.

CHRIS PINO

Santa Rosa

Rent control’s value

EDITOR: Will rent control, Measure C, help the homeless? Speaking on behalf of our local grass-roots group, Homeless Action, let me count the ways.

One: It would keep people from becoming homeless. Every week, we talk to someone who is in danger of losing his or her housing due to a rent increase or eviction. Our neighbors and family members become homeless for no other reason than rent increases.

Two: It would keep some rents within reach of people who are currently homeless. Current market-rate rents are nearly impossible. Even so, homeless people scrimp and save. And some find housing. Without rent control, this thin hope disappears.

Three: It would ease the pervasive fear that no individual homeless person can find an apartment in Santa Rosa. Anxiety and the lack of hope are terrible side effects of homelessness. They contribute to the deaths of 30 homeless people every year in Sonoma County.

Four: Rent control tells homeless people and other poor people that they are valued residents of Santa Rosa.

Tell homeless people and housed people (tell everyone) that housing and stability for homeless people are important to all of us.

Vote yes on Measure C.

ADRIENNE LAUBY

Homeless Action

Mocked by France

EDITOR: Those darn French. They’re doing it again — showing us up by choosing a rational and reasonable president instead of an appalling and ridiculous one like we have. Who do they think they are?

DAVID BERG

Santa Rosa

A tepid argument

EDITOR: The May 7 paper included an editorial recommending a no vote on Measure C (“No on C: The wrong tool for SR housing crisis”) and a Close to Home piece in support of the measure (“Yes on C, but there’s a middle ground”).

However, upon reading the Close to Home authored by Santa Rosa Councilman Jack Tibbetts and School Board member Jenni Klose, it became clear that they weren’t expressing strong support for the measure. The bulk of the text enumerated arguments reminiscent of the no on C ballot statement and went over related, complementary proposals that actually aren’t on the ballot. They didn’t talk about the nearly 12,000 families, seniors and students who would be helped by this measure. Instead they talked about how the ordinance would have “negative unintended consequences.”

Taken together, these two pieces will leave many busy voters feeling as if the no camp has strong arguments, and the yes camp has tepid, ambivalent support. There are many leaders and elected officials who could offer a strong endorsement of Measure C on its merits. Tibbetts and Klose aren’t those people. I have nothing against Tibbetts and Klose, but that high-profile space in a Sunday paper should have been given to someone who could do justice to the yes on C campaign.

ARIELLE KUBU-JONES

Santa Rosa

Fixing health care

EDITOR: The only way Americans will end up with a decent health care system is to immediately suspend coverage for all current and past members of Congress. They then should only be allowed to receive the coverage they create for the rest of America. I bet members of Congress would then take the time to read what’s in the final bill before voting. On second thought, that’s probably a stupid bet to make on my part.

GARY ROBB

Sebastopol

Special interest money

EDITOR: Hey there, Mr. Politician. Yeah you, the one with the taxpayer-financed budget, pension and health insurance. So you want to charge higher health insurance for people who make unhealthy lifestyle choices. Smoking? How much money did your campaign accept form tobacco companies? Obesity? Did junk food conglomerates fill your re-election coffers? Cancer at an all-time high? You couldn’t turn down contributions from the chemical and oil companies, could you?

It seems like the special interests seduce consumers into using the products that are making them sick and then watch the money roll in. Politicians gladly accept their contributions, give them tax breaks and yet won’t care for the common folk who are suffering from their products. Isn’t it time that politicians valued people over profits and compassion over corporate interests?

PHILLIP FARBER

Santa Rosa

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