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Pass housing bills

EDITOR: A limited supply of housing with high demand is one of the main reasons why the cost of housing in California has skyrocketed and why, when taking into consideration the cost of housing, California has the highest rate of poverty in the country.

Over the past eight years, public investment in affordable development has plummeted 66 percent, including more than $1 billion a year that vanished when California’s redevelopment agencies were dissolved.

As the California Legislature completes the final week of this year’s session, lawmakers are battling over two bills for funding to help build more affordable housing. SB 3 would put a $4 billion housing bond on the ballot next year. SB 2 would fund about $250 million worth of low-income housing and housing assistance each year with a $75 fee on mortgage refinances and some real estate transactions.

Californians and our economy need sustainable funding for affordable homes to ease the housing and homelessness crisis. Our elected officials need to do what is right for Californians and approve these bills.

JACOB RICH

Sebastopol

Law, order and DACA

EDITOR: Many people who profess to be supporters of “law and order” and/or “the rule of law” are using these terms to hide the fact that they are racists at heart.

The DACA issue illustrates this tendency, with the racist-in-chief as a prime example. President Donald Trump had Attorney General Jeff Sessions claim “the rule of law” as the reason for ending the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. However, it is racism, bigotry and just-plain meanness that are behind their actions. Hiding behind the rule of law is as phony as they are.

Don’t misunderstand me. The police, and any other peacekeeping institution, must operate with law and order and the rule of law intact. My dispute is with those who use these noble terms to conceal their prejudices and intolerance.

ROBERT STRAUSS

Cloverdale

‘Special relationships’

EDITOR: Nicholas Kristof’s Sept. 5 column (“When we’re complicit in war crimes”) is a very accurate portrayal of what is going on in the Arabian Peninsula and the Middle East. And it sheds some light on what we call “a special relationship.” Whenever we have a special relationship with a country, our values and principles are out the door.

Not only do we not condemn any atrocity by such a country, our presidents make it a point to go to their court and offer all kinds of help. And as if that is not enough, we even allow their prime ministers to come here and deliver rousing critiques of our national security policy to joint sessions of Congress.

When it comes to special relationships, we have no declaration of human rights. We would rather honor our special relationship.

SHAHROKH MOAVENI

Santa Rosa

Changing football

EDITOR: Yes, Paul Gullixson, football needs to be changed, but as long as it generates nearly $14 billion for the NFL it’s won’t (“It’s time to change football as we know it,” Sunday).

The words cited from Drs. Ty Affleck and Robert Nied are the most telling: “there is ‘no protective device, technique or medicinal supplement’ that can prevent concussions” and “the most successful approach to decreasing concussion rates is simply limiting exposure to risk.”

There is no equipment that can keep the brain from bouncing around inside the skull. Tell that to all the Joe Six-Packs sitting in front of their TV every Sunday, Monday, Thursday and Saturday. Tell that to the family with a son or sons who can elevate their plight of poverty with the-ever-so limited chance that they’ll reach the NFL and its riches.

It’s not going to change unless more journalists and neuropathologists and family physicians educate patients and families about the folly of getting to the NFL, NHL, WBA, etc. It’s not going to change without a continued, concerted effort by you and all of the above to increase the number of schools that are dropping the sport. Thank you very much for publicizing the issue. Now, don’t let up.

DON ALLCOCK

Santa Rosa

Rewriting history

EDITOR: Ron Sondergaard says that he need not recite the actions of President Barack Obama to prove he was the “only president to involve the U.S. in constant war for his two full terms” (“War-friendly Obama,” Letters, Saturday).

I think he does need to tell us in detail what those actions were as we became “involved” in both wars under the previous administration. He said it was “a nonpartisan matter,” then blamed the “impetuous Democratic Party” that was led by a spoiled child. Well, as the Republicans had control of both houses for all but two years, exactly who was doing the spoiling?

This type of rewriting history and finger-pointing serves no one.

JON VISSMAN

Santa Rosa