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A war on California

EDITOR: I would like to thank the Trump administration for clearly showing how truly committed to states’ rights it is.

Administration officials have called for our state officials to be arrested should they refuse to have our law enforcement agencies do the Department of Homeland Security’s deportation work for them.

The Commerce Department has stated that it views any future attempts by California to pass a net-neutrality law as being superseded by federal authority.

The recently passed tax bill was handcrafted to force California to further subsidize the federal government.

The Interior Department proposes to sell offshore oil and gas leases off our coast despite California’s wishes to avoid repeat devastation of our environment and our fishing, recreation and tourism industries.

And, of course, the Justice Department has decided to resume its failed war on cannabis in California.

California is the world’s sixth-largest economy. Furthermore, we are kind of experts on immigration, cyber-issues, energy independence and cannabis. One would think that would be enough to justify respect for our state’s rights.

Maybe it’s because we forgot our tiki torches?

GABRIEL FROYMOVICH

Healdsburg

Trickle-down tax reform

EDITOR: How magnanimous of Summit State Bank and other companies set to reap windfall profits from the tax cut (“The perks of bonuses,” Sunday). They dole out small amounts of cash to create an aura of generosity. But the checks are a fig leaf for the worst kind of trickle-down tax reform.

Tax cuts for the wealthiest and large companies will add $1.4 trillion to the national debt and increase our already shameful income inequality. The legislation also eliminates the individual health care mandate, which will negatively affect more than 13 million people.

Employees may be happy to receive this handout, but we’ll pay for this largesse in the future through cuts to our Social Security and Medicare benefits, health care for poor children, food stamps and other desperately needed programs.

Our children and grandchildren will pay for the increased national debt through higher taxes required to pay it down.

This tax cut threatens us all. The rich and large companies are laughing all the way to the bank.

DAVID CARLSON

Santa Rosa

Broken promise

EDITOR: We are stunned and disappointed with the actions of county supervisors to rescind their promise to waive building permit fees for victims of the fire (“County charges fees to rebuild,” Jan. 1).

The convenient excuse that the Federal Emergency Management Agency is to blame doesn’t cut it for me. And the county thinks it’s OK to wait seven weeks to drop this bombshell on the victims?

If FEMA is behaving badly, then the county owes it to the fire victims to exercise its legal options to ensure that FEMA does its part. It appears that the supervisors aren’t even thinking about it.

The county owes the victims and all county residents complete transparency on this issue. Otherwise, it will seem that the county intends to use permit fees as an offset to reduced real estate tax collections.

ECKHARD KONKEL

Santa Rosa

A social contract

EDITOR: Recently I’ve noticed all kinds of stuff in recycling bins, including food and clothing. Some of it is reusable and should be donated. Some of it is trash and belongs in a trash can. Our commitment to recycling is a social contract. It’s based on the honor system. We do it because it’s good for the environment and reduces the size of the landfill.

When trash is mixed in with recyclables, it spoils it. It adds to the cost of processing and generates a less valuable recycled product.

If something can be used by someone else, donate it. If you have too much trash, save some till next week or ask a neighbor if she has room in her can. Maybe all of a neighborhood has too much trash. Order a debris box and share it.

Don’t spoil the recycling, please. It’s irresponsible and breaks our social contract. Sonoma Strong and beautiful.

SARAH PHILLIPS

Santa Rosa

Avoiding lies

EDITOR: I have a simple solution for Robert A Casper Sr.’s concerns for the truth and lies by the media (“The biggest threat,” Letters, Friday): Stop watching Fox News.

MICHAEL JONES JR.

Santa Rosa

More of the same

EDITOR: I’m going to try to hold my tongue, but it won’t be easy. The residents of Sebastopol’s Green Valley Road, both near and beyond Green Valley Creek, have been dealing with years of road damage, road closures, flooding and property damage. All this due to rainfall that cannot be carried by a damaged creek system.

Last year, you reported at length about the problem, and Supervisor Lynda Hopkins held a meeting and promised results to alleviate the problems. The road was repaired, and I saw nothing done to the creek.

Well, we just had the first hard rain of the year, and guess what? The road is again overrun by the creek. We can expect road damage (to the just repaired road), flooding and property damage again. Just more of the same. I’m tired of talk.

DAVE ALBRITTON

Sebastopol

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