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Inaccurate portrayal

EDITOR: I was pained to read the New York Daily News article on John Lasseter (“Will John Lasseter return to Pixar?” April 27). Pained because it felt like an article that had chosen its conclusion and then went out to try to support it.

As the president of Walt Disney Music, I worked alongside Lasseter for 25 years on every Pixar animated feature as well as every recent Disney animated feature. So when I read things like Lasseter would only take notes from Steve Jobs, I knew that to be preposterous. I sat in hundreds of creative meetings with Lasseter, and he listened and drew creative notes from all the participants.

On our personal favorite project, “Frozen,” he did amazing creative work alongside a leadership team that consisted of a strong female co-director and writer and a female composer.

The article also said he made comments about women’s looks. He never once made a remark like that in my presence. You generally know who of your male friends say those things — Lasseter wasn’t one of them.

Now, as a fellow resident of Sonoma, I’m well aware of Lasseter and his wife Nancy’s incredible generosity to our community. While no individual is perfect, I can definitely say the “darker” or “angrier” Lasseter isn’t someone I have met.

CHRIS MONTAN

Sonoma

Restoring net neutrality

EDITOR: In a few weeks, the state Senate will vote on SB 822 by Sen. Scott Wiener, one of the best net-neutrality protection bills proposed across the country. This bill would reinstate the internet protection recently rescinded by the Trump administration.

AT&T and Comcast’s army of lobbyists are trying to stop it. Ending net neutrality gives an unfair advantage to large corporations that can pay internet service providers to prioritize their content.

Brick-and-mortar businesses in our neighborhoods need net neutrality to compete with large online retailers. Whether it’s a restaurant advertising a menu or a local florist using a website to do deliveries, these businesses can’t compete with national companies that might be able to pay for preferred internet access

Will our legislators succumb to corporate influence or reinstate the protections that have worked so well up till now?

BRUCE BUCKNER

Guerneville

Home invasions

EDITOR: I am astounded, dismayed and horrified. A man from Miami, suspected of breaking into a home, tying up two residents at gunpoint and stealing a significant amount of marijuana, is charged with robbery, kidnapping, false imprisonment and conspiracy — and has his bail set at $100,000 (“One arrested in Santa Rosa home invasion,” Friday). Within hours, he has bailed out. What kind of court system is being run here? Does anyone else see anything wrong with this sequence of events?

JANE WILDER

Windsor

Missed opportunity

EDITOR: Had they objectively covered the story of Alfie Evans, the folks at The Press Democrat would have won the Davis prize for excellence in journalism (“Boy whose parents fought to keep on life support dies,” April 29). As it is, they missed it. No, they panned it. But how could this be?

Here was a truly great story. A beautiful little boy with a deadly disease. Loving parents wanting to take him to Italy for further treatment. Obstinate British judges, refusing to let him go, pulling his life support, hoping he’d die quickly, finding he wouldn’t, and reviling all who opposed them. A world incensed, a pope involved, a cruel death that outraged Lady Justice herself. And in the end, Alfie above, filled with glory, and us below, covered in shame.

Again I ask: How could our Pulitzer Prize-winning editors turn a blind eye to Alfie’s story? I will tell you. They dare not cover it because then their progressive readers might inadvertently see the true face of the godless, elitist and statist tyranny for which they advocate day after day. And a face that ugly is simply too dangerous to behold.

But remember, God gives prizes, too. Simply love justice, speak truth and win a long, sweet interview with Alfie Evans.

DEAN DAVIS

Santa Rosa

Saving forests

EDITOR: This is in response to Wednesday’s article headlined “Rescuing redwoods.” How about rescuing the whole forest? The remainder of old-growth redwoods (estimated at 7 percent of their original volume) is pretty much equivalent to the condition of our private forests in general.

Our forests (14 million acres of private forestland in California) are important for the production of wood products, water supply, fish and wildlife, sequestering carbon and constraining greenhouse gas emissions, climate change mitigation and recreational benefits.

Forests can recover — if managed properly. A current report by the Legislative Analyst’s Office suggests that Cal Fire and the state Board of Forestry aren’t capable of attaining future desired outcomes of forest improvement and recovery. If industry is allowed to dominate forest management, recovery will not occur.

You can read the analyst’s report here: http://lao.ca.gov/Publications/Report/3798

I am not in agreement with all of the report’s findings. The report brings issues into the open that need attention.

ALAN LEVINE

Coast Action Group

A good read

EDITOR: Peter Schweizer’s latest book, “Secret Empires: How the American Political Class Hides Corruption and Enriches Family and Friends” is a must read for every American citizen. The actions of both Democratic and Republican politicians who have taken part in these schemes are laid out chapter after chapter. Greed has replaced honesty and integrity, and millions of dollars flow to those who have put personal wealth before our country and the people that they represent.

JOE COLLINS

Santa Rosa

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