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Loss for all

EDITOR: I have read a couple of letters in “Let the Public Speak” from residents of Coffey Park and Fountaingrove who lost homes commenting that people driving through their neighborhoods are looky-loos.

While the loss I feel can’t be compared to how these people are feeling, as a 49-year resident of Santa Rosa, I am deeply saddened for our community. Yes, I drove down Baird Road where I grew up, and yes, I drove by Coffey Park with tears streaming down my face. I needed to take in the enormity of what happened. I live less than two miles from Coffey Park.

We are all devastated by your profound loss. The loss of homes, the loss of jobs, the loss of treasured mementos, and the ultimate loss, the loss of lives.

DEBORAH GWEN VOGAN

Santa Rosa

Who approved fund?

EDITOR: I’ve voted as a Democrat for 50 years and always voted to pass ballot measures that I thought would benefit our community — building needed hospitals, schools, libraries or repair roads. I never voted for my tax dollars to settle sexual harassment lawsuits because of misdeeds by our elected officials. So how, when and why did our Congress ever approve this slush fund to have their constituents pay to settle these lawsuits and then cover up the practice?

We had the Catholic Church parishioners pay for the sexual misdeeds of their clergy, and I’m indignant that we taxpayers have been paying for the sexual misdeeds of our elected representatives. Not only are we paying for them, we didn’t know these crimes were being committed. They were covered up by our own Congress.

It’s bad enough we have to live with a president who has led this practice, but do we really need to financially support these criminal acts, too?

MARIAN MURPHY

Healdsburg

Find right medicine

EDITOR: High blood pressure has been called the silent killer. You don’t notice anything, and then, suddenly, a major stroke, and you are severely incapacitated the rest of your life.

Climate change is our collective silent killer. Life goes on as usual. The kids go off to school. We go to work. Do our chores. Have parties. Yes, the weather is sometimes bad, but that’s always been true, right? Maybe not.

The editorial in the Oct. 16 edition of The Press Democrat makes a powerful case for the connection between our horrific firestorm and climate change (“What Others Say: The climate-change fire alarm from Northern California.”) Drought and heat here, extreme wetness there, all add up to major atmospheric changes, as the hurricane winds Santa Rosa experienced on Oct. 9 showed us in unmistakable ways. Not to mention hurricanes in Puerto Rico, Houston, Florida, etc.

If you find out you have high blood pressure, you find the right medication and make changes in your lifestyle to bring it under control. When are we going to take seriously the dire need for addressing our silent killer, the climate crisis?

ARDATH LEE

Santa Rosa

Performing despite fires

EDITOR: The firestorm shortened our half-semester practice, some of us endured evacuation from our homes, and we’ve missed most deadlines to promote our event this first time. But our older adult readers theater will present our very first show at the 6th Street Playhouse Studio Theatre on Saturday, Dec. 9 and Sunday, Dec. 10.

“A Vocal Conspiracy Holiday” is a lively, fun-filled performance of holiday-themed stories, verse, and prose by the Vocal Conspiracy, a performance troupe drawn from Santa Rosa Junior College Older Adults Program classes in Readers Theatre. There will be old and new classics, which are funny, poignant and even zany.

Readers theatre consists of performers reading aloud from script books in hand. Like radio, the audience will visualize in their minds the action and feelings expressed, though there will be slides and some movement as well. Beginning and Advanced Readers Theatre classes are scheduled for upcoming semesters and are free.

Please come out Saturday afternoon or Sunday evening to support this new Santa Rosa performance entity for seniors and have great holiday fun doing so. Tickets can be purchased at the 6th Street Playhouse website and box office.

BILL TRZECIAK

Instructor, director Santa Rosa

Missing the point

EDITOR: Your Tuesday article “Ranchers left in limbo” misses the point. All the ranching properties at Point Reyes National Seashore were bought by American taxpayers in the 1960s and 70s. The enabling legislation stated that those sellers were permitted to stay until death of the seller or his spouse. Yet they are still there on public land, damaging the landscape, plants and wildlife.

As a regular visitor to this national park, I was surprised to find your only pictures were of people and not one of spectacular views or tule elk or other wildlife that draw millions of people every year. No one comes to see the modern (not “historic”) cattle operations in this national park. Many visitors are appalled at the stench and bare, eroded ground in the cattle areas.

Tule elk are rare, but dairy and beef cattle are not. There are dozens of livestock operations in Marin and Sonoma counties alone. Tule elk have been eliminated over most of their original range and now draw visitors from all over the world to Point Reyes National Seashore.

The public interest lies in the preservation of this rare and special coastal prairie in California.

KAREN KLITZ

Berkeley

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