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DENVER — Kyle Freeland gave up hits and even got hit, but the rookie gave the surging Colorado Rockies the outing they needed.

Freeland pitched six solid innings and shook off a liner off his pitching arm, Tony Wolters drove in two runs and the Colorado Rockies beat the San Francisco Giants again 5-1 on Saturday.

The Rockies are 9-1 against San Francisco this season and have won the last eight against the Giants. Colorado had 14 hits but only one for extra bases, a double by pinch-hitter Pat Valaika in the seventh inning.

“A lot of singles today. That tells me there was some pretty good pitching,” Rockies manager Bud Black said.

Freeland (8-4) wasn’t as sharp as his seven shutout innings against San Francisco on April 23, but he held the Giants to one run and eight hits despite pitching in traffic in every inning.

The rookie left-hander left with a 2-1 lead and pumped his fist after striking out pinch-hitter Brandon Belt to end the sixth with a runner on second.

“He pumped me up,” Wolters said. “He jumped off that mound, started fist pumping. I love that energy about him.”

Freeland had a scary moment in the fourth when Joe Panik’s line drive up the middle hit him near his elbow and then glanced off his biceps.

The trainer looked at him and after one warmup pitch he said he was fine.

“A little knotted up but I’ll be alright,” Freeland said. “I didn’t know if it was going to swell up immediately or have structural damage but they ran a couple of tests out there and it was fine.”

Giants starter Matt Cain took a shot off Carlos Gonzalez’s bat in the fourth but stayed in the game.

Nolan Arenado made it 3-1 with a single in the sixth and Wolters and Valaika had two-out hits in the seventh to stretch the lead to 5-1. All six runs in the game were scored with two outs.

Cain (3-6), winless since May 15, lost for the fifth time in six starts and Joe Panik had three hits for the Giants, who have lost five in a row and 14 of 18.

Panik was denied a fourth hit when first baseman Mark Reynolds caught his liner and stepped on first to double off Kelby Tomlinson to end the game.

“We’re not doing enough to win the ballgames,” Giants manager Bruce Bochy said. “We score 17 runs in the first two games and we can’t get a win, and we get a pretty good pitching job and we get one run today. That’s kind of how it’s gone for us.”

TRAINER’S ROOM

Giants: LHP Madison Bumgarner (left AC shoulder strain) threw a 40-pitch bullpen session in Arizona on Saturday. Bochy said he will have another session in a few days. ... C Buster Posey started at 1B to take stress off his sore left ankle.

Rockies: LHP Tyler Anderson (left knee inflammation) was scheduled to throw 75 pitches in a rehab start for Triple-A Albuquerque and RHP Jon Gray (stress fracture, right foot) is slated for a rehab start for Albuquerque on Monday. If things go well both could rejoin the Rockies rotation next week.

STREAK SNAPPED

Arenado’s misplay of Nick Hundley’s grounder in the second inning was his first error of the season. Arenado’s 71-game errorless streak, which included the last three games of 2016, was the third longest by a third baseman in club history. Vinny Castilla went 75 games without an error in 2004 and Jeff Cirillo’s 85-game errorless streak in 2001 tops the list.

Fires force Raiders to change practice

The Raiders adjusted their practice schedule Wednesday because of poor air quality resulting from the wildfires in Sonoma and Napa counties.

The Raiders took the practice field in smoky conditions with even some ash falling from the sky. The Environmental Protection Agency said the air was “unhealthy” in Alameda, about 40 miles from the fires.

The Raiders shortened their practice by eliminating individual drills in an effort to limit the amount of time players spent outside.

Coach Jack Del Rio said earlier in the day that the team had people monitoring the air quality to determine whether it was safe to practice.

“We think we’re OK to work today in this,” he said. “We’re monitoring the different levels of smoke that is here and we’re going to make sure we do the right things with our guys.”

Oakland later decided to reschedule today’s practice, having it start at 11 a.m. rather than 1:45 p.m. in hopes of better air quality earlier in the day.

The Raiders teamed with the Bay Area’s other pro sports teams to donate $450,000 to support the fire relief efforts. The Raiders, 49ers, A’s, Giants, Warriors, Sharks and Earthquakes also set up a website (www.youcaring.com/firerelief) for fans to make their own donations.

“When a tragedy hits this close to home, we feel it’s our duty to get involved and to help our community and those who have been impacted,” A’s President Dave Kaval said.

The Raiders have a particularly strong relationship with the areas affected by the fire because they hold training camp in Napa each summer and have formed bonds in the community there.

“My heart really goes out to the families,” quarterback Derek Carr said. “Our thoughts and prayers are with all the families that have lost houses, loved ones. That kind of stuff, that’s real life. That’s hard. Being 2-3 is not hard when we really think about it. Doing that kind of stuff, that’s what’s really hard. Our prayers are with them that they can have peace and encouragement.”

— Josh Dubow, Associated Press