Sierra snowpack well above average after California storms

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SAN FRANCISCO — Back-to-back California storms have blanketed the Sierra Nevada in snow, more than twice the snowpack level compared to this time last year, with winter still nearly two weeks away.

At the same time last year, the Sierra snowpack was 47 percent of average, the San Francisco Chronicle reported Friday.

A series of systems starting around Thanksgiving dropped several feet of fresh powder in some mountain areas.

In the southern Sierra, Mammoth Mountain has recorded nearly 6 feet since Oct. 1. The ski resort claims to have the deepest snowpack in the country right now.

Mountain snowpack provides about 30 percent of the yearly fresh water supply for California, which has struggled with drought in recent years.

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