Thursday’s Letters to the Editor

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Taking climate action

EDITOR: I’m thrilled by the success of the global climate strike — more than 4 million folks marched in support of serious climate action. Let’s remember that our actions can continue every day.

Small steps lead to significant ecological healing if we all contribute. Composting, eating less meat and more plants, planting trees and pollinator-friendly gardens instead of lawns, shopping locally at sustainably minded markets and companies, all help improve our environmental footprint. So does reducing air travel and instead adventuring via train.

But what about when we cannot take public transit to get somewhere or we participate in activities that have a less-than-optimal carbon footprint? Fortunately, we’ve got options. We can donate a few dollars toward carbon offsets — tree-planting or other carbon-sequestering activities locally or around the world (a few minutes of research on charitynavigator.org ensures we’re supporting a trustworthy offset organization).

We can also magnify our power by contacting local or state officials and asking them to support environmental protection and climate action legislation.

We’re clearly not alone in caring for Earth and for each other in this fragile time. Solutions often bloom when we treat each other with kindness and compassion.

REBECCA CANRIGHT

Sebastopol

A lesson in humanity

EDITOR: Friday’s article headlined “Water in the desert” was like a breath of fresh air. A married couple, the husband from a conservative background and firmly pro-Trump and his wife, just as adamant in the anti-Trump camp, put aside their political differences to provide water for refugees in danger of dying of thirst. They were wise and big-hearted enough to put aside the politics and act as fellow human beings for people in need.

Thanks for letting your readers know that there are folks out there who understand that our common humanity transcends all the political hoopla. A lesson for all of us.

HANK MATTIMORE

Windsor

Speak out, and vote

EDITOR: Concerning Donald Trump, don’t let the impeachment proceedings obscure in any way the ongoing serious destructive actions and inactions committed by this president and his administration against the United States, the American people and our allies around the world. He is dividing, weakening and isolating our nation. Stand for good, speak out, register and vote.

JOE CLENDENIN

Santa Rosa

Wrong site for compost

EDITOR: Sunday’s article provided some insight into the reasons being considered for moving the proposed compost operation several hundred yards to the southeast of the original site (“Trade 1 compost plant for another?”). Supervisor Susan Gorin’s comment that “It’s farther away from neighbors” makes it sound as if this proposed shift should mollify the local community.

Our concerns are unchanged: Traffic, noise, flooding, surface water and groundwater pollution, destruction of wildlife habitat and air pollution — dust, dirt, odors and the known presence of airborne carcinogens resulting from compost activities of the sort proposed.

The city of Santa Rosa and Sonoma County know these operations emit a toxic haze. The presence of these particulates is well documented, and the county waste management agency acknowledged the health risks to nearby residents from airborne carcinogens emitted by composting operations.

Why then has this same agency (now known as Zero Waste Sonoma), along with the city, proposed locating the facility in an area with so many homes? Is our local community to be considered dispensable collateral damage?

Our city and county government agencies need to do better. They must find an appropriate site for this operation, in a nonpopulated area.

GREG EICHER

Santa Rosa

Drugs and homelessness

EDITOR: I concur with Norm Howard (“Loss of quiet, safety,” Letters, Oct. 2). We have no say in what is going on. I sit in dismay as a 51-year resident at what has happened to our city.

We are being fed that the homeless problem is solely due to affordable housing. If you look around at the hypodermic needles strewn about on city streets, trails and parks, you will discover what the real issue is. Our parks, trails and creeks are unusable. There is debris and human waste everywhere. It is disgusting.

We need to put a stop to this now. Ask any drug counselor and they will tell you the only thing that will help an addict is tough love. I believe we are enabling people from hitting bottom so they realize they need help. We need our police to stop the illegal drug flow they are getting.

I believe that the citizens in our community are all on board with wanting to help the underemployed get housing and, of course, to work with the mentally ill. I think we draw the line at enabling drug addicts.

ROBERT E. INGHAM

Santa Rosa

Tobacco and fires

EDITOR: Tobacco is one of the most addictive substance known to humankind. The fellow who started the Petaluma fire this past week started the fire while trying to put out his lit cigarette in dry grass (“Man hurt in Petaluma fire,” Friday). Ignorance can be educated, but stupid cannot be fixed. Most roadside fires in California are caused by tossed cigarettes, not vehicles.

SUE HART

Point Arena

You can send a letter to the editor at letters@pressdemocrat.com.

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