Subscribe

Saturday’s Letters to the Editor

The "Follow This Story" feature will notify you when any articles related to this story are posted.

When you follow a story, the next time a related article is published — it could be days, weeks or months — you'll receive an email informing you of the update.

If you no longer want to follow a story, click the "Unfollow" link on that story. There's also an "Unfollow" link in every email notification we send you.

This tool is available only to subscribers; please make sure you're logged in if you want to follow a story.

Please note: This feature is available only to subscribers; make sure you're logged in if you want to follow a story.

Subscribe

A relic of the past

EDITOR: I disagree with your support for keeping standardized tests in university admissions decisions (“UC should stick with standardized tests for admission,” May 16). In a world where individuals have a computer in their possession at nearly all times, why would we put so much, if any, emphasis on a test that measures recall ability and a narrow set of knowledge? When has your boss said, “I have this incredibly important project I need you to tackle; just make sure you don’t turn on your computer, open a book or ask anyone for assistance or advice when you try to complete it”?

These tests were created to meet the needs of a different era. The workplace of the last century is a distant memory, and the skills to thrive in today’s world bear little resemblance to those of the past. If one wants to argue that academic institutions are still a place where high-stakes testing is valued, that’s more of an indictment of higher education than a reason for supporting antiquated assessments. And if standardized tests are such a valuable tool in determining readiness, why does the U.S. have a 40% college dropout rate?

Universities have better options for evaluating prospective students, and many have begun to use them. Recommending that UC continue to rely on an outdated testing system is, frankly, shortsighted and ill-informed.

DAN BLAKE

Sebastopol

Science as ideology

EDITOR: In response to Peter Wellington’s letter (“Dangerous claims,” Tuesday), the fact is that much of the science isn’t conclusive to the directives being issued. Take for example the requirement to be masked when in close proximity to others, which was implemented in response to the possible spread by asymptomatic carriers. What does science say?

For one thing, COVID-19 hasn’t been proven to be present in aerosols and, like other coronaviruses, is mainly spread through droplets that enter the body through the mouth and/or eyes.

Furthermore, a recent study published in the reputable Annals of Internal Medicine showed that the force of a cough propelled viral droplets through cotton and surgical masks. In fact, masks could be a vehicle of transmission if not properly disposed of and reused too often, not to mention people touching their face to adjust improperly fitted masks.

The problem is science becomes an ideology, devoid of actual science and critical thinking.

PAUL CARICATO

Sebastopol

Disenfranchised voters

EDITOR: I Appreciated E.J. Dionne’s Monday column (“Supreme Court discovers chaos on its Electoral College tour”). It is beyond me how anyone can make an argument for a system that essentially disenfranchises up to 49.999% of the voters of a state. This idiocy has to go, and in a reasonable world, the Supreme Court would throw out this current case and tell Congress to come up with a popular vote system. As far as the power of the small states goes, that’s why we have the Senate.

HANK SKEWIS

Healdsburg

Unsafe neighborhoods

EDITOR: Growing homeless encampments under Highway 101 have made it nearly impossible to walk downtown. To maintain social distancing, we must run the gauntlet in the street with the traffic.

Derelict RVs and campers are parked along our streets. Now the city has opened an encampment at the Finley Center. The West End is already a magnet for the homeless due to various social service offerings. The Finley camp is another amenity to attract still more unsheltered. Enough is enough.

The quality of life in our neighborhood is poor. We deserve the ability to move about freely without fear and to enjoy our neighborhood without dealing with the disease, addictions and unstable behavior that brought these people to the state they are in today.

It seems as if the homeless have more rights than law- abiding, taxpaying citizens. Other parts of the city and county should be considered for any new encampment or homeless services. Moreover, moving to a sanctioned encampment shouldn’t be voluntary, nor should campers be handpicked, leaving the most needy and incorrigible behind.

The city and county should ensure the safety of our West End neighborhood and other neighborhoods. It’s time to address the underlying conditions that led to the problems of the unsheltered in Sonoma County.

CYNTHIA TORAN

Santa Rosa

Trump’s costly wall

EDITOR: A small article in the second section of Thursday’s paper said that a North Dakota construction company was awarded a whopping $1.3 billion contract to con-struct a 42-mile section of Donald Trump’s border wall.

It’s an irresponsible use of government funds given the reality of cuts because of COVID-19. Schools, essential police, fire, medical and city services are in debt for lack of public funds. Food banks are suffering in a time of severe need. If we aren’t horrified, we aren’t paying attention. Shame on this administration for not taking care of its citizens.

We need funds to develop a COVID-19 vaccine and provide services for the medical community. We don’t need a $1.3 billion wall. I also read he wants to spend billions to paint previously constructed walls black.

This news should have been on the front page. Please vote responsibly in November, and contact your representative as soon as possible.

TERRY SWEHLA

Santa Rosa

You can send a letter to the editor at letters@pressdemocrat.com.

Please read our commenting policy
  • No profanity, abuse, racism, hate speech or personal attacks on others.
  • No spam or off-topic posts. Keep the conversation to the theme of the article.
  • No disinformation about current events. Claims of "Fake News" will be delayed for moderation
  • No name calling. "Orange Menace", "Libtards", etc. are not respectful.
Send a letter to the editor

Our Network

Sonoma Index-Tribune
Petaluma Argus Courier
North Bay Business Journal
Sonoma Magazine
Bite Club Eats
La Prensa Sonoma
Emerald Report
Spirited Magazine