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With critical funding from the Mental Health Services Act (Proposition 63), the county was able to expand our services to develop the innovative Family Service Coordination Program. For the past 10 years, these free services have helped thousands of Sonoma County families navigate the often complex health system, learn about mental illness and how to be there for their loved ones while building their own resilience and support network.

While there’s still much to be done, we are grateful to be part of the solution by empowering people with behavioral health challenges, assisting those who love them and strengthening our community in the process.

— TAMARA PLAYER, CEO, Buckelew Programs

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Mental health coverage

EDITOR: Thanks for your stellar coverage of the state of mental health care in Sonoma County. I appreciate your newspaper’s continued focus on the intractable and complicated issues of poverty, homelessness and mental illness.

I especially valued your first-person accounts from people with mental health issues and family members as well (“Families, patients share stories,” Aug. 27). These people are brave for speaking from the heart about their struggles with these diseases — made all the more devastating by the lack of services and sufficient health care facilities and resources here. I grew up with a mother who had schizoaffective disorder and know that feeling alone and stigmatized, as well as having little knowledge about mental illness or available resources, made our experience tough to survive.

But survive we did, and I salute those who shared their experiences, especially specific details about what was and wasn’t helpful to them in their stories of recovery (and, tragically, of not recovering). We can’t take for granted the urgent need for emergency care beds, longer-term care units, education and advocacy and a strong support network of family and friends and routine talk therapy and exercise.

Please continue to publish stories like these (and include contact information for crisis and emergency lines. NAMI — www.nami.org — is helpful in connecting with education and resources).

— IRENE BARNARD, Santa Rosa

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Bias against men

EDITOR: On Aug. 13, Staff Writer Martin Espinoza reported that nearly 40 percent of the 1,100 inmates held at the county’s jail have some form of mental health issue and that 30 inmates of this sub-group aren’t competent to stand trial (“Jail cells substituting for psychiatric beds,” Aug. 13). I emailed him to ask why he didn’t do a gender breakdown. He declined to directly answer the question.

Why? Because doing so would violate The Press Democrat’s ideological and systemic bias that men are privileged and women are oppressed. Sure enough, 77.9 percent of inmates who have some form of mental health issue are men, and 77.8 percent of inmates incompetent to stand trial are men.

This censorship would never happen if the tables were turned and it was primarily women who were denied mental health services until they were incarcerated. In fact, there would be numerous gender-specific articles on the plight of women who are discriminated against in this area, as there should be.

I invite Espinoza and his colleagues to attend a documentary film on the men’s rights movement entitled “The Red Pill,” which will be screened at the Boulevard Cinemas in Petaluma on Sept. 19.

— JOE MANTHEY, Petaluma

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Inmates and mental health

EDITOR: Joe Manthey accused your paper of being biased against men because you failed to report that about 78 percent of inmates needing mental health services are men (“Biased against men,” Letters, Monday). The Sonoma County Criminal Justice System Master Plan of 2015 shows that 85 percent of inmates are men.

If Manthey had used just a smidgen of math logic, he would have seen that men in the county jail have a lower rate of mental health issues than women inmates.

It remains a moral outrage that 40 percent of inmates need mental health services. We’ve chosen as a society to turn public safety officers into the front-line workers with people who should have been treated rather than jailed.

— CHRIS ANDEREGG, Sebastopol

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