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SUZANNE SHONBRUN

Sonoma

Recycling and Recology

EDITOR: We have “overflow” cans where excess yard waste can go to fill the yard waste can in light weeks. I put a little yard waste in the empty can; leaves and branches are less likely to stick to the bottom of the can than food waste. If Mark Burchill (“Trash and recycling,” Letters, Thursday) has too much yard waste, perhaps he needs a second can or a truck for dump runs.

As I understand it, recycling processing requires clean materials, and dried-on food or other materials are hard to remove from recycled materials. We hand wash some dishes, and the “used up” dishwater is for cleaning cans, plastic containers, cardboard food containers (juice, milk and the like) before they go in the recycling bucket. No wasted water.

This is not a requirement new to Recology, by the way. It’s been true for years.

We recently stayed at a campground where management had decided against serious recycling efforts. It drove me nuts all week to toss stuff, so I’m happy to do a little work for my recycling.

BILL HOUGHTON

Sebastopol

Petaluma war casualties

EDITOR: Regarding the “North Coast, A Look Back” story in the Feb. 5 Towns section, which featured the involvement of Sonoma County Companies C (Petaluma) and E (Santa Rosa) in the Spanish-American War, the soldiers assumed marching in the Fourth of July 1898 photo in Petaluma were located at Camp Barrett in the Fruitvale section of Oakland at that time. By the fall of that year, the troops went from Camp Barrett to the more sanitary Fort Point in San Francisco. The Army mustered them out in February 1899.

And, as to “all of the men” returning, thankfully that is correct for those in the California National Guard. However, two Petalumans, Cpl. Arthur Dean and Pvt. John Pitts, who joined the regular Army and served in the Philippines, were killed in the early days of the Philippine-American War, which commenced immediately at the end of the Spanish-American war.

KENNETH J. NUGENT

Petaluma

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