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I taught for 31 years in Fremont, and it took me all those years to make more than $50,000 a year. If I hadn’t married a man who had a business and was doing well, I don’t imagine I would have owned a home. With home prices now it would be impossible.

I checked salary schedules of school districts, and still a long-term public schoolteacher, with 30 extra credits beyond a bachelor’s, or even a master’s, is lucky to make more than $70,000 a year. Median teacher salary in Santa Rosa is $64,000. San Francisco is about the same. The highest salary offered in San Francisco is $87,700 after 26 years in the classroom. San Francisco is now an unaffordable place for teachers to live.

Isn’t it amazing one can teach in a city but not afford to live in it? Values in this country seem to be that entertainment, be it sports or Hollywood, is worth more than folks who teach our children.

LINDA ELLIOTT

Cloverdale

NRA’s mission

EDITOR: I would like to offer some comments regarding Marc Thiessen’s column defending the National Rifle Association (“Attacking NRA is slap at everyday Americans,” March 2). He leans heavily on the bravery and effectiveness of the NRA instructor who exchanged fire with the shooter at First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Texas. I cannot argue with this anecdotal evidence, even though effective armed responses like these are exceedingly rare.

The citizen who responded was clearly an expert with his weapon. However, many gun owners are not, and a person with inadequate gun skills may actually cause additional innocent casualties in situations like these. Even so, the NRA adamantly opposes legally mandated training as a condition of gun ownership.

And if the NRA is so concerned about gun safety, why does it oppose the banning of bump stocks? These devices allow semi-automatic weapons to fire at a much more rapid rate, but at the same time, they dramatically decrease accuracy — making the weapon less safe to operate.

Despite what Thiessen may claim, the primary mission of the NRA is to maximize the profits of arms manufacturers regardless of the human costs. Thiessen may think that this mission is worthy of respect, but I most definitely do not.

BRIAN GEAGAN

Healdsburg

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