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A measured response

EDITOR: Recently I read of an incident where a homeless man was arrested for brandishing a weapon, which turned out to be a replica gun (“Replica gun leads to arrest,” Sunday).

As the man reached into his saddlebag, one of the responding police officers knocked the man off his bicycle, and he was arrested. I want to thank the Santa Rosa Police Department corporately and specifically the responding officer who assessed the situation and made a judgment call to physically take down this individual.

In today’s climate, it seems we are just a moment away from reading another article about an officer-involved shooting resulting in a death. This was a serious situation involving a call about an armed man. The responding officers would have had no idea the gun was a replica, and the officer’s actions likely saved this individual’s life.

This hearkens back to a time when the use of deadly force was the last action taken by an officer, not the first. The officer should be commended for his or her actions.

BRIAN JACKSON

Windsor

SSU and fire protection

EDITOR: I read Carla Grube’s Close to Home article (“Seeing a partner in fire protection,” April 29). She described the issue of Sonoma State University not wanting to pay its fair share for fire protection. This comes from the executive level of California State University wanting a free ride for services used in the area. CSU hides behind case law that one government entity cannot tax another.

In the case of Rancho Adobe Fire Protection District, SSU would be paying a fair and just fee for services provided, not a tax. In larger communities such as San Francisco, a sales tax recovers revenue for the city to offset fire protection costs. Rancho Adobe has no ability to do that.

CSU wants the taxpayers of a relatively small community to give them a free ride even though the school collects a health and safety fee between $10 and $15 per head for student safety. The school has about 9,000 students.

It is a question of morals and ethics. Should SSU get a free ride or justly pay for fire protection services provided by the citizens of the small community surrounding it?

FRANK TREANOR

Former chief, Rancho Adobe Fire Protection District

Liberal bias

EDITOR: Another week, another display of alt-left bias in the media, including this newspaper. We saw attempts to weaponize climate and immigration policy by so-called journalists (yes, the same crowd you saw cheering and guffawing at the disgraceful White House correspondents dinner.)

One of the many ways jaundiced journalism manifests itself is the failure to provide context (i.e., the other side of the story.) This past week’s coverage of immigration failed to report that, according to the State Department and studies at Temple University Law School, “The US admits more legal immigrants than all the nations of the world combined. … Most countries don’t welcome immigrants at all.” Key words here are “legal immigrants.”

We also saw repeated criticism by certain countries of U.S. climate policies. But according to the International Energy Agency’s March 22 report, “Global Energy and CO2 Status Report,” the U.S. led the group of only four nations that actually lowered greenhouse gas emissions. The very countries that scolded the U.S. for pulling out of the Paris Accord performed far worse than the U.S.; their emissions climbed, while those of the U.S. declined.

May I remind the media and this newspaper of a couple of Code of Ethics items from the Society of Professional Journalists: “Provide context,” and “Abide by the same high standards expected of others.”

D.P. HALL

Santa Rosa

The chapel car

EDITOR: Thanks for printing the very interesting historical article about the railroad chapel car “Good Will” recently uncovered in Boyles Springs (“Railroad car-turned-relic to get new address,” Wednesday).

I had never heard about chapel cars, and neither had my brothers, who are really into trains and railroad history. It also sparked a lively debate among some friends on Facebook when I posted the article and pictures.

It was amazing to me that none of us had ever heard about these. And what a nice diversion from the rest of what is in the news these days.

SHERRILL DUNNING-RILEY

Windsor

Nuclear power

EDITOR: The tribute to the women who helped shut down nuclear power in Sonoma County is a tribute to women who may have saved our lives (“The coastal crusaders,” Saturday), but how much fossil fuel was burned to produce electricity in the past 50 years? How much carbon dioxide have we put into the atmosphere since we shut down pollutant-free nuclear power?

The unintended consequences of our decisions are nonetheless our responsibility and our legacy. Carbon-free energy for the past 50 years vs. fear of technology — who is sure which is best for the environment? Perhaps we should consider alternatives.

ROGER DELGADO

Sebastopol

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