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A young star

EDITOR: I read Chris Smith’s column about Kailee Diaz-Randall with great interest (“SR girls’ got a lot of game,” June 11). As usual, Smith hit the nail square on the head.

Having been a Little League umpire for more than 10 years, I first came across Kailee three years ago. I was fascinated by her joy while playing baseball. As she grew older, she became better and better. I attribute this to her love of the game and the tutoring of coach John Perry.

I recently umpired a game in which she was pitching. As I walked by the dugout, I said, “Pitching today, huh?” She responded with her infectious smile. “Yeah,” she said, “kinda nervous.” I said it was just a baseball game and reminded her to have some fun. She pitched five shutout innings.

Now a little bit about Perry. He is a legend. I have never seen him yell at a child. He always encourages his players to do the best that they can. Those of us who have had the pleasure of knowing him know that he embodies the Little League motto, “We use the game of baseball to teach children how to become adults.”

JOHN FERRANDO

Santa Rosa

Responsibility for Trump

EDITOR: Never have we experienced such caustic governance. Since claiming overwhelming victory after losing the election by 3 million votes, Donald Trump has invented facts to promote his destructive agenda. He attacks the credibility of the international scientific community to assert his charges that man-made climate change is their hoax, despite all evidence to the contrary

He staffs key posts with those who will help him dismantle hard-earned environmental reforms that are vital to curtail the dangerous decline in the health of our planet. He asserts that environmental reform measures will devastate the economy, which contradicts economic indicators.

His withdrawal from the Paris climate accord and the Iran nuclear agreement, and his endless rhetoric, characterize his reckless and uninformed policies, which damage peace processes and our international standing.

Through his war against the environment, Trump is accelerating climate change and the decline in our quality of life.

Prime blame for this lies not with Trump, who behaves as a capricious child, nor with the legislators who have defaulted their duties by allowing such conduct. Instead it lies with the voters who planted him in office — and still tolerate him.

ROBERT SETTGAST

San Rafael

Affordable housing in RP

EDITOR: Tuesday’s article on the Station Avenue mixed-use development in Rohnert Park included some good news and some bad news (“Proposed complex gets bigger”).

The good news is that the number of new housing units won’t decrease from an earlier plan, despite the new plan making room for a hotel. The bad news is that the number of affordable units will be less than required by city policy, and the developer won’t have to pay for the shortfall. Why and why? Aren’t lower-income people supposed to live downtown?

WALTER MUELKEN

Sebastopol

Unexpected industry

EDITOR: What is it that people who report on marijuana don’t understand about the vote in 2016? Pretty much everyone I know voted to decriminalize the use of cannabis and private grows. No one envisioned the booming industry that is attempting to insert itself into our local lifestyles.

Not one person would have imagined an industrial cannabis operation at the end of a narrow, winding, private road. No one imagined the smell from a cannabis operation, which has permeated an otherwise bucolic Sebastopol neighborhood where the residents cannot go outside or open windows or doors due to the stench.

Why is it that reports found in The Press Democrat tend to downplay or fail to report the severity of these problems? I challenge anyone to go investigate this matter.

CHARLENE STONE

Santa Rosa

Let the suit proceed

EDITOR: A deputy shoots and kills a 13-year-old in the back multiple times. He has since been promoted. His partner didn’t feel there was any imminent danger. Now the county wants to shield this deputy, Erick Gelhaus, with immunity from civil action (“High court weighs Andy Lopez shooting,” June 11).

That would be an egregious step that would further approve a shoot first, worry about rights later approach to law enforcement. Let the civil suit proceed.

DONNA CHERLIN

Forestville

Moving out

EDITOR: Do you know about Assembly Bill 1668, which was signed into law earlier this month? Sacramento will require us to use no more than 55 gallons of water per capita per day. Yes, that’s right. Then, by 2020, the amount will be 50 gallons per capita per day.

I already had one foot out the door; now it’s both. Maybe other measures could have been taken first, but it’s easier to put the burden on taxpayers. I’m outta here. California has already had a mass exodus to other states — Idaho, Texas, anywhere but here. When your tax base disappears, then what?

To anyone reading this elsewhere, don’t move to California. You’ll be sorry.

CHRISTINA MELVIN

Petaluma

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