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Rules sometimes change

EDITOR: A front-page article in Saturday’s paper concerned the woes of the marijuana dispensary folks (“Dispensaries strained”). This was prompted by a change in state regulatory requirements for such operations.

I must assume that the owners involved have some level of business acumen. Ever since the law passed allowing for adult use of cannabis, the rules have been under a constant state of development and change. This isn’t something that wasn’t anticipated, and it has been occurring at the state, county and local levels all along.

Jumping into this market with its known fluctuating regulatory environment was a risk that I have to assume the operators were well aware of — and willing to accept. So when the rules change, operators ought to accept what was known to be a realistic possibility and move on without moaning and groaning.

BRANTLY RICHARDSON

Santa Rosa

Cartels and immigration

EDITOR: We appreciated the attendance of The Press Democrat at the Republican Party’s speaker series. Unfortunately, many statements by Susan Tully were omitted (“Speaker assails border policies,” Thursday).

Tully discussed at great length the role of drug cartels in the arrival of illegal immigrants to the southern border. Many children coming to the United States are coming with members of the cartels and not with their families.

Cartels are targeting major cities in the United States and are extremely sophisticated in how they are increasing their trafficking. The cartels aren’t interested in achieving the American dream that so many legal immigrants want. They have much bigger goals, and if they need to use and abuse children, that isn’t a problem.

Also, regarding the Southern Poverty Law Center: The Southern Poverty Law Center is a leftist organization funded in part by George Soros. In a recent court decision, it was ordered to pay $3.375 million to Maajid Nawaz for including him in the “Field Guide to Anti-Muslim Extremists.” The Southern Poverty Law Center is very quick to label anyone it doesn’t agree with as a hate group and as a racist organization.

EDELWEISS GEARY

Santa Rosa

End fireworks sales

EDITOR: I cannot help but wonder about the greed and insane practice of selling fireworks in Sonoma County (“Fireworks in the hot seat,” Friday).

Is the profit of a few organizations more valuable than the lives, homes and wildlife of all that live here? To sell fireworks to people who may or may not be capable of using their brains is unconscionable and should be against the law.

Although fireworks are illegal in the city of Sonoma, they are sold everywhere in Petaluma. Fire knows no boundaries. Nonprofits should be ashamed as this is too risky, and they should be held responsible if a fire occurs.

A list of who profits should be in the news, and maybe those groups should find a way to raise money for their organizations without putting the danger of a fire in our path.

ELAINE LIEBER

Sonoma

Chanate development

EDITOR: The city of Santa Rosa’s recent neighborhood meeting regarding Bill Gallaher’s proposed development of the Chanate Road campus was simply a fishing expedition for him to anticipate the challenges during the planning and entitlement process (“Strong reaction to housing plan,” June 26).

We were presented half-truths and half-baked enticements in this thinly veiled attempt to appease us regarding his over-the-top development. Does he think a dog park, an amphitheater and a speculative Oliver’s Market will make this poorly designed development more palatable?

Supervisor Shirlee Zane seeks to label opponents of the 867 high-rise apartments and thousands more vehicles along Chanate Road as NIMBYs. We are not NIMBYs. We just want a sensible development that fits the neighborhood. We want an explanation of how increased traffic will flow when it already gridlocks, and we want a realistic plan demonstrating safe evacuation in case of another disaster such as last October’s fire.

This development built downtown, rather than making a car a necessity, would allow people to walk to work, shop, dine and take public transportation. Two thousand more people living downtown would certainly help with the stated goal of revitalizing downtown, instead of unnecessarily and adversely impacting the diminishing open space and wildlife along Chanate Road.

PETER SCHINDLER

Santa Rosa

Excessive subsidies

EDITOR: We keep hearing from our elected officials in Washington that our economy is vibrant and unemployment is at a decades’ low. They goes as far as to proclaim that there is a shortage of workers. At the same time, we have bidding wars between states to lure employers to their areas.

Here in California, we wisely withdrew from a contest with Nevada for a Tesla battery plant. Amazon’s Jeff Bezos and Tesla’s Elon Musk are experts at pitting states against one another to extract subsides. However, Wisconsin has taken this to another level.

Foxconn, an Apple contract manufacturer, is being offered $4 billion in development subsidies and tax abatements to locate a factory there. That pencils out to about $307,000 per job, or $18,000 per resident of the state.

Perhaps a better gauge of the economy would be the Bureau of Labor Statistics labor-participation rate, which indicates that 37 percent of working age Americans have no job. At least that would explain giveaways that reek of desperation.

DON JONES

Santa Rosa

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