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Roaring toward disaster

EDITOR: The president loves to rave about the roaring economy, and those who support him clap with glee. As with many things coming out of this administration, it is a based on false premises.

I will only mention three concerns. First, by all but eliminating science from the Environmental Protection Agency, and bulldozing toward deregulating the protections we need for safety and the health of the planet, discharged carbons will continue to accelerate.

Second, the so-called middle-class tax cut, which benefited the wealthy and big business, has deficits soaring. The dishing out haphazardly of tariffs has the administration giving our tax money to farmers who didn’t want these tariffs in the first place.

Lastly, the assault on our workforce, especially the immigrants and lower-rung folks, will leave vital work undone. Who will clean the hotel rooms, cook the food served in restaurants or pick the food from the farms?

By ignoring the consequences of these policies, the economy is roaring toward disaster. This is just a hunch, but in two years, by the end of this term, even the GOP base may be ready for the incredible repair work that will need to happen.

NOEL J. O’NEILL

Willits

Rendering a verdict

EDITOR: In a recent letter, the writer casts doubt on Christine Blasey Ford’s “100 percent” certain identification of Brett Kavanaugh as the person who sexually assaulted her (“The verdict,” Thursday). The writer believes Kavanaugh is innocent of Ford’s charge and concludes: “What verdict would you render as a jury member?”

When the background investigation was reopened by Sen. Jeff Flake, it’s unfortunate that the White House restricted its scope, with the result that the FBI only interviewed nine persons over five days. It appears that more than 40 additional persons — including high school friends and college roommates — had been identified as potential witnesses.

Several of the potential witnesses (not interviewed by the FBI) have given their accounts in public, and their accounts differ substantially with many of Kavanaugh’s statements given under oath.

It will be catastrophic if Kavanaugh is confirmed by the Senate and solid proof emerges over the next few months that Ford’s charge was true or that Kavanaugh committed perjury before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Obviously, either Ford or Kavanaugh is lying. Based on their testimony, I believe Ford.

BILL WRIGHTSON

Santa Rosa

False allure of debt

EDITOR: It is sad to see the Press Democrat editorial board unable to pass on endorsing any tax increase. Bond measures are just that, but the horrible part is that they enable us to enjoy the benefits now, while our children pay the taxes later.

At the same time, bonds send billions of dollars in profits for the bondholders and sellers. So while that act of compassion seems wonderful, realize that the majority of your money will go to the wealthiest Americans or institutions that buy the bonds, which are often used to offset their income taxes as the profits from the interest are tax free.

If these ideas are indeed solid ones, then let’s increase our current taxes and pay for them ourselves. We have already given $21 trillion of debt to our offspring; there is no justification for any more.

ALAN PETTY

Santa Rosa

Candidate: No conflict

EDITOR: City Council members face many tough votes, especially on land use. These decisions can have long-term impacts, but it doesn’t make sense to judge a candidate for public office by one possible position on a specific project.

Not every project is the same, and the future of the former hospital site on Chanate Road is worthy of extra attention. That’s why I’ve met with local residents on both sides of the debate. The Friends of Chanate have hard questions, but the voice of local residents must be respected.

I’ve now spoken with an attorney, who advised me that my work on a women’s shelter on the site will not prevent me from casting a vote if this comes to the Santa Rosa City Council.

The future is unclear. The original project proposal is now stalled. This is the perfect opportunity to re-engage the community in a more inclusive and accessible process. If elected to the Santa Rosa City Council, I will ensure neighbors’ voices are heard.

As the only candidate who is a renter, I understand the struggle to secure more affordable housing. But we need to build more housing in the right way, not the quick way. Let’s start that work now.

MARY WATTS

Santa Rosa

A universal warning

EDITOR: I grew up and lived at the edge of a large Midwestern town. We could hear a siren located at the fire station that was sounded when a tornado was heading toward our town.

San Francisco installed 50 air raid sirens in 1942. In 2005, using $2.5 million in federal funding, the city updated those 50 and added 90 sirens. Those sirens are capable of broadcasting in three languages. Sonoma County and the city of San Francisco are the same in that both are made up of mixed terrain. All Sonoma County residents need to be treated alike, to be warned by sirens sounding.

Technology can help warn residents and give them updates, but when the power goes out as it did in October 2017, those systems fail. Depending on technology, or someone knocking on one’s door, cannot and must not be the only forms of warning.

I am encouraged that Sonoma County is pursuing the idea of installing sirens.

BRENDA STEELE

Santa Rosa

You can send a letter to the editor at letters@pressdemocrat.com

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