s
s
Sections
Search
We don't just cover the North Bay. We live here.
Did You Know? In the first 10 days of the North Bay fire, nearly 1.5 million people used their mobile devices to visit our sites.
Already a subscriber?
iPhone
Wow! You read a lot!
Reading enhances confidence, empathy, decision-making, and overall life satisfaction. Keep it up! Subscribe.
Already a subscriber?
iPhone
Oops, you're out of free articles.
Until next month, you can always look over someone's shoulder at the coffee shop.
Already a subscriber?
iPhone
We don't just cover the North Bay. We live here.
Did You Know? In the first 10 days of the North Bay fire, we posted 390 stories about the fire. And they were shared nearly 137,000 times.
Already a subscriber?
iPhone
Supporting the community that supports us.
Obviously you value quality local journalism. Thank you.
Already a subscriber?
iPhone
Oops, you're out of free articles.
We miss you already! (Subscriptions start at just 99 cents.)
Already a subscriber?
iPhone

In other counties, advisory councils truly represent their communities because they are elected. In Sonoma County, the councils will be appointed by the area’s supervisor. This allows a supervisor to have complete control of the situation and appoint individuals who will advance his/her particular agenda or point of view.

Also troubling here in the Springs area of Sonoma Valley is that there was no public, inclusionary process for all interested to give input into how we want to be represented.

Yes, elections cost money. But if the point is to give unincorporated residents a true voice in local government, then the advisory councils should be chosen via elections by the people they are supposed to represent.

GINA CUCLIS

Sonoma

The climate caucus

EDITOR: It was heartening to hear Sen. John McCain’s speech chastising both political parties for putting party loyalty above the time-honored democratic tradition of dialogue and compromise. People of all political stripes are dismayed by the dysfunction we see in Washington.

Happily, there is one issue where bipartisan progress is being made: climate change. The majority of Americans believe that climate change is real and human caused. Reflecting this sentiment is the emergence of the Climate Solutions Caucus in Congress. This caucus, which started with only 16 members less than two years ago has recently grown to 50. And the remarkable thing is that members of the caucus can only join in pairs, one Republican and one Democrat. The message is clear — solving the climate crisis is on track to be a bipartisan effort.

We should express our heartfelt thanks to our congressman, Mike Thompson, for finding a Republican partner and joining the Climate Solutions Caucus recently. For those in Congressman Jared Huffman’s district, we should encourage him to join Thompson in the caucus and start the dialogue on moving toward a climate solution.

DAVE WARRENDER

Sebastopol

Show Comment