s
s
Sections
Search
We don't just cover the North Bay. We live here.
Did You Know? In the first 10 days of the North Bay fire, nearly 1.5 million people used their mobile devices to visit our sites.
Already a subscriber?
iPhone
Wow! You read a lot!
Reading enhances confidence, empathy, decision-making, and overall life satisfaction. Keep it up! Subscribe.
Already a subscriber?
iPhone
Oops, you're out of free articles.
Until next month, you can always look over someone's shoulder at the coffee shop.
Already a subscriber?
iPhone
We don't just cover the North Bay. We live here.
Did You Know? In the first 10 days of the North Bay fire, we posted 390 stories about the fire. And they were shared nearly 137,000 times.
Already a subscriber?
iPhone
Supporting the community that supports us.
Obviously you value quality local journalism. Thank you.
Already a subscriber?
iPhone
Oops, you're out of free articles.
We miss you already! (Subscriptions start at just 99 cents.)
Already a subscriber?
iPhone

People of all faiths opened the doors of their houses of worship.

On my return drive Sunday night, I was distracted by the brightly lit cross on a well-recognized hillside. It announced that this was a place for adherents to one religion only. No room for any other religious symbol; no crescent moon, sword, lotus flower, Star of David.

The controversy over this cross has been around for 35 years. In a 2015 Press Democrat article, Chris Smith addressed the dispute saying, “the only opinions that matter are those of the couple who own the property on which the cross resides.” The owners of the property wanted trespassing to stop then and urged neighbors to contact the police.

Owner Suzanne Merner said, “It’s really time that the hillside return to the state it was in.”

This is a time for unity. A dove of peace might be a more universal symbol. But the best solution is to just let this piece of land return to its natural state.

JANYCE BODESON

Santa Rosa

Buy local

EDITOR: It was extremely disappointing to read that David Guhin, Santa Rosa’s planning and economic development director, contracted with a large, multi-national corporation headquartered in France to process rebuilding permits for the city.

What expertise and ability to streamline Santa Rosa’s permit process this foreign company possesses that we don’t have locally is hard to imagine.

The $9 million contract could have paid for a lot of overtime, borrowing of skilled personnel from other local jurisdictions and hiring local people to do the work, as well as better economizing the permitting process.

I’m completely supportive of making it easier and faster to rebuild our communities. But at a time when every dollar is precious to our local economy, this seems like a glaring missed opportunity to “buy local.”

BONNIE HOGUE

Santa Rosa

Show Comment