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EDITOR: On Christmas Eve in The Press Democrat we were subjected to a gallery of photos of crying young children sitting on a Santa’s lap (“Ho-Ho no”). How exactly do these children’s experiences make for a “hilarious memory” for them? Why would sensitive adults find humor in the terror these children are certainly feeling?

You went so far as to label their feelings “a temper Santrum,” falling, as so many adults do, into the habit of making this the children’s problem. The problem is with the adults who place young children on the lap of a strange man who holds them tightly and doesn’t look like anyone the know while strangers stare at them and take photos.

No wonder they’re crying. Their misery is made into a laugh. How about a little compassion? How would you feel?

CLAIRE BEERY

Rohnert Park

Where’s Herrington?

EDITOR: There have been news stories, columns and letters from the public about the Mary Schiller fiasco, yet there’s been no statement made or action from Steven D. Herrington, our county school superintendent. Where is he?

STEVE WEAVER

Windsor

The greater good

EDITOR: I would like to take exception to Alan Wayne’s assertion that “people who have money should not be required to support those who do not” (“So what if the rich get help?” Letters, Dec. 23). That is short-sighted.

The backbone of our democracy is that everyone contributes so the greater good can be achieved. Infrastructure, schools, law enforcement, the justice system, etc., benefit us all and create a society that works for the good of all of its citizens.

Our income tax system recognizes through income levels the amount individual citizens pay. But those who don’t earn enough to pay any income tax still pay a variety of taxes — sales taxes and fuel taxes among them.

Where there is government waste, by all means, let’s fix that. But the structures of our democracy require everyone to pay their fair share. (That is, if we wish to keep it.) To ask those at the bottom and middle part of the scale to pay more of their worth than those at the very top is obscene and is not sustainable in a democracy.

LINDA NAGEL

Ukiah

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