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Chanate land sale

EDITOR: The proposed sale of the 82-acre Chanate property to developer Bill Gallaher for between $6 million and $12 million seems like an incredible giveaway. In this environment of uncontrolled campaign financing, the specter of campaign contributions swaying the vote of Sonoma County supervisors is concerning, particularly with the history of the large donations a member of the Gallaher family in support of Santa Rosa City Council candidates and the lawsuit by Gallaher and his son-in-law against The Press Democrat after reporting about these contributions.

I am impressed by the Health Professionals for Equality and Community Empowerment and their efforts to shine light on this potential sale and their commitment to the health of this community (“Doctors fighting sale,” May 30).

KEVIN MILLER

Fort Bragg

Dental concerns

EDITOR: Dental disease is a serious public health issue, not just in Sonoma County and not just for children (“Dental disease: A silent epidemic,” Close to Home, Wednesday). I now understand why many senior citizens have bad teeth. They can’t afford the procedures they need. A crown costs up to $2,000, an implant upwards of $6,000, including the oral surgery, and a root canal is about $1,500. Most of these procedures would be necessary whether or not there’s fluoride in our water.

Medicare doesn’t cover dental procedures. Dental insurance is either extremely expensive or has a limit of $1,000 to $1,500 per year. Instead of putting medication in our water, how about having insurance plans that make dental care more affordable for everyone?

If Medicare added dental, it probably would cut medical expenses for chronic illnesses. And if low-income parents could afford dental care, they might get their children to dentists as well as get their own needs covered.

It’s not ignorance, it’s the expense — as proved by the number of people who flock to free dental clinics because that’s the only way they can get care.

Going to the dentist is scary for a lot of people. It shouldn’t be scarier because of the cost. Working for meaningful dental coverage for everyone makes more sense than putting an additive in our water supply.

ANNETTE FLACHMAN

Windsor

DUI risks

EDITOR: It is time for barbecues, fireworks and/or enjoying yourself at Spring Lake Regional Park. Parties often include alcohol and can turn from festive to fatal if driving is involved. Before drinking, choosing a designated sober driver is a priority.

When I was 16, in 1992, I was hit head-on by a drunken driver. The collision gave me many broken and dislocated bones, paralysis and a 100-day coma. I was a patient in two hospitals for seven months followed by therapy for 17 months. Not a life I wanted. My hearing, talking and walking are damaged because a drunken driver hit me 25 years ago. This tragedy can happen to anyone. Driving drunk is preventable, and we must make that clear to all.

You don’t have to be falling-down drunk to be too impaired to drive. Therefore, a fun-filled summer comes only with a sober driver.

LORI MARTIN

Tracy

Waiting for the bus

EDITOR: For 30 years, I have ridden Santa Rosa CityBus, and I always have been able to get wherever I needed to go in a reasonable amount of time. Not so any longer. With the rollout of the new Reimagine CityBus (“Santa Rosa shakes up bus service, routes,” May 26), I am having to rely on my husband to get me to the Finley Center for my twice weekly dance classes. On Wednesdays, I walk home from Finley, a distance of two miles. I would have a minimum half-hour wait for the next bus, and I can walk home in just about that amount of time.

I’m going to buy an adult tricycle and regain my freedom and independence. Thank you, CityBus, for the years of good service. I’ll see you around.

JEANNE LOVELL

Santa Rosa

A great America

EDITOR: It seems clear to me after reading Wednesday’s paper that our governor, Jerry Brown, and Pittsburgh’s mayor, Bill Peduto, are hard at work keeping America great. Taking notes Mr. Trump?

RICHARD A. DURR

Santa Rosa

Selling rights back?

EDITOR: As a rural Sonoma County rural resident, I am one of the estimated 6,000 rural water well owners, and I find the new California groundwater law to be another case of the government stealing our rights and then selling them back to us (“New landscape on groundwater,” Sunday).

I think it would be easy to say that of the 6,000 rural residents with wells, most if not all also have a septic system, and that probably more than 90 percent of the water we pump out of the ground is returned to the aquifer via our septic system. What could be more “sustainable” than that? Will we be given credit for the water we put back in the ground? And the mere thought that $2 to $4 dollar per month fee that Supervisor David Rabbitt suggested will be enough to cover the additional cost of the bureaucracy that is going to be associated with this is pretty hard to believe. Any government bureaucracy’s main task is to grow and sustain itself at the expense of the public.

REX SCHIMMER

Fulton