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Gardening weather

EDITOR: I think people have forgotten: it gets hot here. And it rains. We’ve had several years of drought. Pity the newcomer who didn’t know it can rain so. Yes, it was more than normal, but it was spread out. The river flooded but not like years past.

Now it’s the heat. The Press Democrat says we broke a record last weekend. Yeah, for one day, not the season. Anyone who’s lived here some time can tell stories. My neighbor said when she moved in, it was 113 degrees. I remember hiking with friends in Trione-Annadel State Park and it reached 108 degrees.

We’ve had cool summers for about 10 years. I think Santa Rosa only met 100 once last year. And people forget. Thankfully we can say, “It cools off at night.”

Folks, we need heat for tomatoes, zukes. Remember what Luther Burbank said: “the best place for all living things!” As gardener, I’m tickled this year. My plants, flowers and trees are bursting, but I still carry shower buckets. I’m proud to remember to conserve water.

We live in a Mediterranean climate, and we never know what next year will hold. People say, “As far as the weather, you don’t have to be crazy to live in California, but it helps!”

MARSHA TAYLOR

Santa Rosa

Santa Rosa crack up

EDITOR: This town cracks me up — Measure C to punish landlords, don’t build too close to my property, look at the traffic jams it will cause.

San Francisco and points south are in the midst of huge building booms after a terrible recession, while this little town, with oodles of vacant land, fights and wrestles to keep the bucolic landscape that we don’t have.

Has anyone looked at what the Chanate Road developer has built before? Probably the only decently designed housing in the whole town. In case you haven’t noticed, this town is a mess with litter and homelessness all over. If every person who wrote to you about our homeless problem took in two homeless people, we wouldn’t have the problem.

I guess it’s OK to have thousands of acres of grapes and wineries that hire few people and pay practically nothing, not to mention kill off most of our wildlife, but God help anyone who tries to build anything in town. Not too many screams about the airport though; the planes must not fly over the better parts of town.

OK, it’s hot and I have aired my frustrations. Now, I will take my dog for a walk in a small, local park. We don’t need hundreds of acres.

JOY WAKEFIELD

Santa Rosa

A Sonoma dispensary

EDITOR: Hey, neighbors. Join with myself, Richard Silver and Earl Blue for it is time for a legal medicinal cannabis facility in the city of Sonoma.

The City Council took up this issue on May 20, 2009 when I was Sonoma’s mayor. Unfortunately, I took the advice of City Attorney Tom Curry and recused myself. The result was a 2-2 vote, and the matter was unresolved.

It was a mistake on my part, and I slept at the radio station for a while. There was a conflict if the council was deciding the company to run the cannabis facility. But we were voting on the Planning Commission’s plan, and there was no conflict.

Times, the council and voters have changed. The voters of Sonoma passed by a large majority the concept of medical cannabis. The voters have spoken. It is time to place a Sonoma medicinal dispensary on this council’s agenda. We will be in this year’s Fourth of July Parade, and I ask the public to join us and support us.

KEN BROWN

Sonoma

Cellular antennas

EDITOR: Senate Bill 649 is a shameless gift to the wireless industry. SB 649 would put cell antennas on every block in every neighborhood in California. Unlimited companies would be able to install unlimited antennas with an over-the-counter permit.

The fact that these antennas are so-called “small cell” doesn’t mean they are safe. The Federal Communications Commission calculates radiation safety by what the public exposure levels are, including frequencies, radiated power and distance. SB 649 would abandon the public to trust the wireless industry to certify radiation safety.

SB 649 would eliminates local zoning authority, conflict with federal laws and increase harmful wireless radiation. Independent scientists are calling for immediate measures to reduce radiation to protect children, public health and nature.

More than 120 cities, including Sebastopol and Santa Rosa, oppose it. Urge your state Assembly member and senator to oppose SB 649.

SANDI MAURER

Director, EMF Safety Network

Sebastopol

Compassion is limitless

EDITOR: In response to Wednesday’s letter about rescuing dogs in China (“Rescue people, not dogs”), may I offer a different perspective to those who mistakenly and unfortunately believe that, somehow, compassion is limited? It bewilders and saddens me that anyone may believe this myth and choose to live this way.

If we want the world to be a more compassionate, loving and peaceful place, why spend our precious time judging others on how they choose to help the world become a more compassionate place? This seems like a waste of valuable time, energy and resources.

The truth is compassion is limitless beyond measure. Compassion also has no borders. We all can have, and act on, an unlimited amount of compassion for as many beings in this world as we wish: children, the elderly, disabled people, under-served and under-represented populations, people in Peru without clean water, the homeless and abandoned cats and dogs; cows, pigs, chickens, ducks, sheep, lambs, rabbits and horses raised for slaughter and dogs brutally killed unnecessarily for a delicacy food in China. Compassionately acting on behalf of any one population isn’t exclusive to being able to act with compassion for any other.

If you believe that any of these suffering beings deserve your compassion, then act on it.

KAREN STANLEY

Santa Rosa