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Still the worst

EDITOR: I’m writing to thank the county for managing to maintain Sonoma Mountain Road in Petaluma as the worst road in Sonoma County (“Sonoma Mountain Road voted worst in Sonoma County,” Nov. 29, 2015).

I especially like that they do nothing or very little to maintain or improve the road. It’s especially clever that they don’t clean the ditches, so that when it rains water comes down the middle of the road, creating more holes and problems. They don’t clean old or install new culverts, so the road floods unnecessarily with even more craters in the roadbed. And when they fill some potholes, they don’t cover the bald spots, so the next storm or traffic can create even more holes. After all, you have to keep as many as possible to remain the worst road.

There are dairies and ranches, and PG&E needs to service its transmission lines. This road also serves the transmitter sites for the County Sheriff’s Office, Channel 22, county emergency management, several radio stations and two-thirds of SMART’s rail radio communication coverage. I’d hate to think of the ramifications should this road become even worse and not traversable, which it nearly was this past winter.

I cannot believe that one of the richest counties in the richest state has roads that are worse than those of the Third World.

Isn’t it interesting that the word maintain can mean “to improve” or “to keep as is.” It seems the county has chosen to do nothing. But I understand. You have to keep that designation.

BARRY C. LAWRENCE

Petaluma

Health care debate

EDITOR: Did anyone else notice the tragic irony in Friday’s Press Democrat, pages A8 and A9? The article on A8, “Revised health bill has fewer winners,” accompanied by the picture of the smugly smiling senator from Kentucky, Mitch McConnell, was across from the article on A9 and pictures of two of his constituents — a suffering newborn with an opioid addiction and her addict mother, residents of Richmond, Kentucky.

The description of the costly treatment to save this baby’s life brings up several points that McConnell seems willing to ignore. Who pays for this baby’s treatment? The hospital? The family, which would incur a lifetime of debt? A small tax on wealthy individuals to support Medicaid? Or, do we as a country just say, tough luck, baby, it’s not our problem?

JANE SNIBBE

Cloverdale

Wealth care plan

EDITOR: This is the Republican health care plan: take money away from the Affordable Care Act and give major tax breaks to the wealthiest people in America. Hey, let’s just call it what it is: wealth care.

TRICIA HOFFMAN

Sebastopol

Wrestler in chief

EDITOR: Now I understand why the Donald’s campaign persona was so familiar — the make-believe world of professional wrestling. When I read “Trump tactics mimic pro wrestlers” in the July 4 people column, it all connected.

The posturing, the bad-mouthing, the sudden turn of his head and steely-eyed thrust of his jaw in reaction to something said by his debate opponent and the hyperbole in everything he says is straight from the writers, directors and actors of professional wrestling. But pro wrestlers are actors. No one takes them seriously, especially themselves, most times. Everyone knows it’s strictly entertainment.

But he put on such a good show that even he started believing his own aggrandizement of self. Well, it happened. Enough voters bought the hype to shoehorn Donald Trump into the presidency. Instead of parting the ropes for him to climb through and to strut off into the sunset and obscurity, ending the show, enough manic fans were still caught up in the absolutely greatest hoopla this country has ever seen, actually seated the buffoon on the throne.

He’s in the office, but he doesn’t know what to do there. He really doesn’t. Can you say, oops?

WAYNE MINSON

Santa Rosa

Chanate Road property

EDITOR: Thank you to the Board of Supervisors for going through a lengthy process to sell the Chanate Road complex (“County allows sale of 82 acres for rental units,” Wednesday). Once this property is officially sold, the builder can begin the process with the city of Santa Rosa to review plans to provide much-needed housing for seniors and veterans. Our housing crisis finally has some hope that we will actually see something that will put a dent in it. As a resident of Chanate Road, I support and look forward to seeing this property providing housing that is sorely needed in Santa Rosa.

TONY ALVERNAZ

Santa Rosa

Bad climate policy

EDITOR: While President Donald Trump has missed the boat on being a leader on our climate’s health, our governor isn’t steering the boat on the best course either.

AB 398, the cap-and-trade bill he has cooked up behind closed doors and is trying to rush through the State Legislature a la Mitch McConnell and Paul Ryan, would provide billions of dollars in free allowances and tax breaks to polluting industries but does nothing to support low- and middle-income families.

It would be ineffective at reducing emissions and will mean we fail to meet our climate goals.

Our Assembly members and state senators need to realize the wrong direction this bill takes us. It would be wrong that California’s climate policy favors big corporations at the expense of the health of its communities.

TOM HELM

Santa Rosa

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