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Another woman?

EDITOR: As I pick up the paper this morning and reading the article on Frances Farais, I am shocked that once again a woman from Sonoma County is accused of just helping herself to money that did not belong to her. This is about the sixth woman that has been accused or convicted in this way of which I am aware. There may be more.

What is wrong with these women? Do they just think that if they need money they can just help themselves to money that does not belong to them?

I want to take them and shake them and I hope the court does not allow them to go free with just a little slap on their hand.

As a woman, I am shocked and disappointed in them. We expect this type of behavior from criminals, but I guess the crooks and criminals in our society have a way of disguising themselves as innocent ladies.

NORA WARD

Santa Rosa

Senseless reasons

EDITOR: I sympathize with Sheri Graves (“Too old for kittens?” Friday letters). I admire the work animal rescue organizations do. Unfortunately, they too often turn away good people for senseless reasons, thus leaving animals without homes.

We applied to adopt a horse from a local rescue. We have owned horses for 30-plus years, are financially stable and able to provide for all our animals’ needs and believe in being an animal’s “forever home.” Our horses live on our property. We personally see and care for them every day. Despite this, we were denied because we do not have a horse trailer so could not take our horses for trail rides, and my daughter, who is shy with strangers, was deemed to not be “enthusiastic enough.” It was heartbreaking and senseless.

I remain a strong supporter of adopting rescue animals. However, I am often disappointed by the stories I hear of denied adoptions for extremely misguided and petty reasons.

DANELLE JACOBS

Sebastopol

Never forgotten

EDITOR: I had mixed emotions upon reading about the death, at age 90, of Dr. Marian Diamond. Sadness that UC Berkeley students will never have the chance I had to sit in on her lectures and become excited about the brain’s potential, and happiness that I had the privilege of being taught by her and enjoying her “end of the semester” dinners in her home where she made all of us feel so welcome. What a wonderfully generous woman.

She had a great sense of humor and a passion for imparting knowledge that was remarkable.

She loved teaching, and she loved her students. And during the lonely and stressful time of graduate school, she created a haven for those of us lucky enough to learn from her. She fired my curiosity about medicine, how the brain works, and the creative force of our intelligence.

I will never forget her.

CONNIE KELLOGG

Sebastopol

Noise still a problem

EDITOR: This is in response to the editorial: “Oakmont dispute is no longer about fun and games” on July 28. I liked your comment “the new board should move forward with a commitment that all future decisions be made in a collaborative spirit with a premium on transparency.” I hope you’re right that this is possible.

You also said “the board should press ahead with a compromise plan to remodel the courts at the East Recreation Center,” suggesting that padded paddles and sound buffers will solve the noise problems.

Padded paddles are quieter but not quiet. Going from two to six courts will be noisy. Also, the geography of the area means that sound buffers won’t help. Former Oakmont board President Ellen Leznik once called this conversion a win-win.

From another point of view, it’s a lose-lose-lose. Because of the noise, the tennis club is losing its courts at the facility. Because of the noise, the pickleball club has offered shorter hours and quieter paddles (Yes, there are considerate pickleball players).

And because there’s not yet a quiet way to play pickleball, the neighbors above the courts (including me) will still have the noise.

I don’t want to vote ‘no’ to pickleball, but I’m still hoping for a better solution.

MARY BLAKE

Santa Rosa

Downtown trials

EDITOR: I had breakfast at Mac’s in downtown Santa Rosa on Monday morning, and the homeless were trying to out-crazy each other. There was a guy having a conversation with himself, no, an argument, while across the sidewalk was some guy who looked like he had just crossed the desert and taken Aqaba with T.E. Lawrence. He was cloaked in blankets, lots of blankets like some Bedouin, just sitting next to the front entrance of Peet’s Coffee. As I moved further east, across from a brewpub was a truly scary individual putting on a mini Broadway musical with himself as the star. I don’t frighten easily, but this guy made me nervous. He was accompanied by his cell phone, which sat on top of a trash can and blasted out complete gibberish that must have made perfect sense to him as he flew across the sidewalk, arms flailing like Fred Astaire on LSD all the time singing more complete gibberish.

Welcome to Santa Rosa’s new and improved downtown. Let’s see $500,000 for 50 beds. That’s $10,000 a bed. Must be nice beds.

Can we all stand and give a round of applause to the City Council for doing such a swell job with our city?

DAVID HAYNES

Santa Rosa

Confused by letter

EDITOR: I am totally confounded by the logic in Don Waltenspiel’s letter of Aug. 5. What has single-payer got to do with a state or country suing a parent or spouse for not properly treating a patient? Or a parent suing the hospital?

Whether we have single-payer or corrupt insurance company insurance, the government has the right to intervene through in hearing brought by Child Protective Services, the hospital, the spouse or family members of a patient that someone deems is being wrongly treated. If you want to fight single-payer it would be more efficacious to use arguments that actually have something to do with the issue.

C. Connell

Bodega Bay

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