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Did You Know? In the first 10 days of the North Bay fire, we posted 390 stories about the fire. And they were shared nearly 137,000 times.
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One-sided agreement

EDITOR: Your Tuesday editorial (“Army Corps plan offers best chance for quick cleanup”) is disingenuous, bordering on negligent with the same insincere language that permeates the opt-in agreement for debris removal.

No evidence is offered showing how the county’s solution is the “swiftest solution.” The compelling reasons why private contractors are delayed in providing accurate estimates are the county’s moratorium on issuance of permits, its hesitance to be transparent with expected standards and its failure to publish acceptable sites to receive the debris in a timely manner.

You suggest that property owners are encouraged to point out locations of property improvements (e.g., pools, septic). However, the agreement’s language doesn’t indicate nor obligate the county to be responsive or accountable. The final decision where to dig and what to remove are at the sole discretion of the county.

There is little wonder that the vast majority of property owners don’t trust the county despite the arbitrary Monday deadline being imposed.

JOHN MACAULAY

Santa Rosa

The climate report

EDITOR: Nowadays, news agencies don’t report news, they only report Donald Trump’s response to news. While that is entertaining it is not the actual news. The global warming report was reported as to how it was related to Trump (“Report contests Trump views,” Nov. 4). The report wasn’t disclosed let alone read.

So I read it. Not easy. The report stated that global warming has two causes — natural, as has occurred every million years, and human factors, which are the primary cause in this current warming.

The report then said that lowering carbon emissions won’t reverse global warming without a way to remove carbon dioxide already in the atmosphere. If we can do both, global warming can be stopped in about 1,000 years. It goes on to say that the only way to reverse warming is to develop a technique such as infusion of sulfur gases in the atmosphere or other techniques that haven’t been developed nor tested.

Now that is news. Basically, it is our fault, but we can’t fix it in less than 1,000 years. Read the report, not Trump’s twitters.

ROGER DELGADO

Sebastopol

Pothole hotline

EDITOR: We all know how bad roads are in Sonoma County, especially in Santa Rosa. Well the city Public Works Department has a unit that addresses potholes. If you call 543-3871 and report a pot hole, they respond in about 48 hours, at least that has been my experience. When you call and give them the location of the pothole or potholes, they ask for your name and number, and that’s all. What a blessing to know that something is getting done to make driving a little more pleasant and that tax dollars are working for you.

STEVE POGGI

Santa Rosa

Lost-and-found pets

EDITOR: I wish to commend you for printing the full-page ads for found animals. There are still many unclaimed pets.

I volunteered at Sonoma County Animal Services caring for burned cats. What struck me most was their resilience. These kitties with crinkly whiskers and bandaged paws pretty much started turning somersaults when someone walked in the room. They’re hungry for attention and affection. They’ve obviously been owned.

The pictures on websites and in the paper don’t do justice to their character and nuances. I strongly encourage everyone who lost a pet in the fires to go in person to the various shelters. People are trapping lost cats daily, especially in Coffey Park. All may not be lost. If you don’t have a place to live yourself, we will board them, no cost. They just need to see you.

Also, remember to check your microchip information and update it. Several chipped cats have no current way to contact the owners. Please keep looking.

TERILYNN MITCHELL

Forestville

A mental health issue

EDITOR: I don’t see why the Groper is so upset about North Korea’s nuclear development. After all, the head Republican must know that it isn’t a weapons issue. It’s a mental health issue — two of them.

TOM JACOBS

Santa Rosa

Assessing hazards

EDITOR: We keep hearing the soil is contaminated, the ash is hazardous, and it all needs to be removed several inches down, including ripping out the concrete structures. When are we going to hear what the toxins are, where they are and what caused them?

I wonder whether the houses near the burned areas also are contaminated. The contamination cannot be confined to the property lines of our unfortunate neighbors. The ash fell on many, many more homes than were burned. Do we need to vacuum the entire county? What about the parks where our children play?

I found some info in an Oct. 29 article on the Napa Fires by Adam Rogers from Wired, and it gave some interesting sources of contamination and where they come from, but it raised far more questions in my mind about where the contamination is now after being thrown thousands of feet into the air and raining down on us all, including the wine we will drink.

Did I miss the communication on this? We are counting on The Press Democrat’s investigative abilities to keep us informed.

CHARLES KENNEMORE

Windsor

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