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Uncivil America

EDITOR: While friends and families of congressmen watched in horror, a disgruntled protester took the extreme anti-Donald Trump movement from hostile acts to domestic terrorism. Social media and TV are generating so much hatred that people are going far beyond what we’ve experienced in the past few elections.

With the house so divided, recreational events for charities that cross party lines are a great way to get better cooperation between the two leading parties. This is one way to start breaking the gridlock in Washington.

There will be no trial for this heartless man as he died in the hospital, and fortunately nobody in either political party was killed.

People simply have to wait until the next election to make their point. Am I supposed to believe that Democrats are the more civil party next time around when you see one display after another like we’ve had? I am starting to regret ever voting for either party.

For the first time since 1980, I could not in good conscience vote for either candidate. Everyone needs to remember the civil war and the horrors it brought to our nation. Let’s not start another.

JORDON BERKOVE

Guerneville

Petaluma housing plan

EDITOR: Addressing a meeting Sunday, Petaluma community leader Greg Colvin stressed the right of Davidon Homes Corp. to propose luxury homes in the pastoral open space adjoining Helen Putnam Regional Park. I join Petalumans for Responsible Planning in advocating their right.

I also join them in advocating that our City Council vigorously exert the rights of our community to have our general plan, zoning regulations, community interests and the California Environmental Quality Act upheld. What’s fair is fair.

I emphasize this because even though Davidon’s draft environmental impact report on Monday’s council agenda is sufficiently inadequate to appear insulting, it doesn’t disqualify Davidon from an honest hearing. For reasons I have detailed in testimony to the Petaluma Planning Commission on May 1, our council must reject the environment report and require a significant revision based on current data and complete facts.

The reasons include using outdated surveys, failing to include previous legal testimony of citizens and experts and hiring a consulting company whose principal has been convicted for illegal removal of the federally listed red-legged frog from a project site.

BARRY ALBERT BUSSEWITZ

Petaluma

Meet Thibault

EDITOR: I wonder how many people who have laughed in the past couple of weeks at Charlie Brown having to loan his baseball glove to a somewhat “rotten kid “ named Thibault realized that the real Thibault is Santa Rosa’s own Roland Thibault. Charles Schulz, a friend and fellow hockey player, immortalized “Frenchie” in two separate series of comic strips. Hats off to one of the greatest guys in the world, Roland Thibault. I’ve never before known anyone in the funny papers.

LYNN HALE

Sonoma

After the 1967 war

EDITOR: Fifty years ago this month, two of my brothers were in Ramallah, West Bank visiting some relatives. Ramallah was the ancestral home of my family until 1948, when we and 750,000 other indigenous Palestinians were forced out of our homes or had to flee as a result of the violence that erupted when Palestine was arbitrarily divided by the U.N., and 56 percent of it was given to the Jewish state.

We ended up in Jordan as poor refugees for the next 10 years, then eventually came to America where after the required years we all became citizens.

But on that fateful day in June 1967, my brothers crossed the 40-some miles into Jordan to visit some friends in Amman. While they were there, the 1967 war broke out, and they, as every Palestinian outside the West Bank at the time, weren’t allowed by the Israelis to go back, not even to fetch their luggage. Their American passports were useless. Why? Because they were Palestinian.

The result of the ’67 war was the brutal Israeli military occupation of the rest of Palestine still going on today.

My question is: when is enough enough? Why do we consider some people more deserving of human rights than others?

THERESE MUGHANNAM-WALRATH

Santa Rosa

Acting in secret

EDITOR: In case readers missed it with all the hoopla about the Russian probe, a small group of Senate Republicans is drafting a replacement for the Affordable Care Act in private (“Health overhaul secrecy assailed,” Friday). Even fellow Republican senators not privy to the discussion are alarmed, not to mention Democrats who have no opportunity to give input.

Once out of committee, the bill will be voted on without the possibility of a filibuster, and with an expedited procedure it can be passed with a simple majority of the Senate.

I don’t think anyone would argue that the Affordable Care Act could be amended, but this change in our health care system is massive and impacts all of us, especially if the law is gutted and leaves millions of Americans without adequate coverage. It should be reviewed in an open manner with ample opportunity for input.

For me, this is personal. Who knew when my son signed up for Obamacare because it was mandated that he would be diagnosed with a rare and dangerous cancer at age 33? A year later, with the medical treatment he has received, he is still with us and hopeful for a full recovery.

MARY LOU VELASQUEZ

Santa Rosa

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