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The offensive players finished Saturday, and the defensive players will finish Monday.

The NFL scouting combine is almost over.

Through the first two days of the combine, 10 offensive players emerged as particularly good fits for the 49ers’ offensive scheme. These are those players.

Note: Players who skipped part of the speed testing or agility testing don’t qualify. For the purpose of this exercise, those players still are unknowns. We’ll learn more about them at their Pro Days.

1. Will Hernandez, G, UTEP.

Combine results: 6-2, 327 pounds, 37 reps on the bench, 5.15-second 40-yard dash, 1.76-second 10-yard split, 4.7-second 20-yard shuttle, 7.59-second 3-cone drill.

Draft projection: Round 1 or Round 2.

Why Hernandez fits: Kyle Shanahan typically prefers small guards — no bigger than 305 pounds. Hernandez is a giant guard who moves like a small one. He’s fast and agile enough to function as a run-blocker in Shanahan’s outside-blocking scheme. And Hernandez is an excellent pass-protector. He will hold his ground against the best defensive tackles in the NFL, such as Aaron Donald of the division-rival LA Rams. Hernandez would fill the 49ers’ biggest need — a starting guard.

2. Connor Williams, G/T, Texas.

Combine results: 6-5, 296 pounds, 26 reps on the bench, 5.05 40, 1.72 split, 4.63 shuttle, 7.83 3-cone.

Draft projection: Round 1 or Round 2.

Why Williams fits: He’s a slim, athletic offensive tackle with powerful, thick legs. In other words, he’s a real offensive lineman. Not some big tight end like a lot of these other fast tackles. And Williams is versatile. He can play guard as a rookie, then move to right tackle in a few years if the 49ers don’t re-sign their starter, Trent Brown.

3. Chase Edmonds, RB, Fordham.

Combine results: 5-9, 205 pounds, 19 reps on the bench, 34-inch vertical leap, 4.55 40, 4.07 shuttle, 6.79 3-cone.

Draft projection: Round 6 or Round 7.

Why Edmonds fits: He isn’t fast, but he’s agile, and agility is what Shanahan values in a late-round running back. Edmonds makes the necessary one-footed cuts as a ball carrier on the outside-zone plays, and runs crisp routes and gets open as a receiver out of the backfield. He could become the 49ers third-down back.

4. Ryan Nall, RB, Oregon State.

Combine results: 6-2, 232 pounds, 15 reps on the bench, 33-inch vert, 4.58 40, 4.16 shuttle, 6.95 3-cone.

Draft projection: Round 7 or undrafted free agent.

Why Nall fits: He’s another agile late-round running back, but he’s much bigger than Edmonds. Nall is similar to Alfred Morris, a 219-pound running back Kyle Shanahan drafted in the sixth round of the 2012 draft. Morris rushed for 1,613 yards and 13 touchdowns as a rookie under Shanahan. Nall is bigger and quicker than Morris ever was.

5. Courtland Sutton, WR, SMU.

Combine results: 6-3, 218 pounds, 18 reps on the bench, 35.5-inch vert, 4.54 40, 4.11 shuttle, 6.57 3-cone.

Draft projection: Round 2.

Why Sutton fits: The 49ers need to groom an heir apparent to starting flanker Pierre Garcon, and Sutton has everything Shanahan wants in a flanker. Sutton is big, strong, he jumps high, he changes directions quickly and he’s just fast enough. He’s the ultimate possession receiver. The Niners probably would draft him in the third round if he falls that far. Draft experts currently consider Sutton a late-second-round prospect, but that could change.

6. D.J. Moore, WR, Maryland.

Combine results: 6-0, 210 pounds, 15 reps on the bench, 39.5-inch vert, 4.42 40, 4.07 shuttle, 6.95 3-cone.

Draft projection: Round 2.

Why Moore fits: He’s big and quick and explosive enough to play flanker, and he’s fast enough to play split end. He can play any receiver position. His stock is rising.

7. Mike Gesicki, TE, Penn State.

Combine results: 6-5, 247 pounds, 22 reps on the bench, 4.54 40, 4.1 shuttle, 6.76 3-cone.

Draft projection: Round 2.

Why Gesicki fits: He’s a “people-mover” in the run game, and a “separator” in the pass game, as Shanahan likes to say. Meaning Gesicki blocks well and he gets open. He’s a three-down tight end – he never comes off the field, just like George Kittle, the tight end the 49ers drafted last year. Kittle is a people-mover and a separator, but may be injury prone, too. He played through injuries most of his rookie season. Gesicki would be Kittle insurance.

8. Dalton Schultz, TE, Stanford.

Combine results: 6-5, 244 pounds, 15 reps on the bench, 4.75 40, 4.4 shuttle, 7.0 3-cone.

Draft projection: Round 3.

Why Schultz fits: He’s an experienced, tough blocker, plus he gets open running short and intermediate routes. But he isn’t fast like Gesicki and Kittle. Schultz would be cheaper Kittle insurance.

9. Kyle Lauletta, QB, Richmond.

Combine results: 6-3, 222 pounds, 4.81 40, 4.07 shuttle, 6.95 3-cone.

Draft projection: Round 5.

Why Lauletta fits: He’s quick enough to maneuver in the pocket, fast enough to roll out and throw, and he’s mid-sized. He fits Shanahan’s physical profile for quarterbacks perfectly. Lauletta’s issue is arm strength — he has none. He’s a weak thrower, like C.J. Beathard, whom Shanahan drafted in the third round last year. Will Shanahan draft another noodle arm this year?

10. Tanner Lee, QB, Nebraska.

Combine results: 6-4, 218 pounds, 4.98 40, 4.41 shuttle, 7.0 3-cone.

Draft projection: Round 6 or Round 7.

Why Lee fits: He played in a pro-style offense last season, he has experience turning his back to the defense on play-action passes and rolling out, and he has a strong arm. Only problem, he’s a bad quarterback. He threw almost as many interceptions as touchdowns in college. Some team will see him as a long-term project worth developing. The 49ers may be that team.

Grant Cohn covers the 49ers for The Press Democrat and Pressdemocrat.com in Santa Rosa. You can reach him at grantcohn@gmail.com.

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