s
s
Sections
Search
We don't just cover the North Bay. We live here.
Did You Know? In the first 10 days of the North Bay fire, nearly 1.5 million people used their mobile devices to visit our sites.
Already a subscriber?
iPhone
Wow! You read a lot!
Reading enhances confidence, empathy, decision-making, and overall life satisfaction. Keep it up! Subscribe.
Already a subscriber?
iPhone
Oops, you're out of free articles.
Until next month, you can always look over someone's shoulder at the coffee shop.
Already a subscriber?
iPhone
We don't just cover the North Bay. We live here.
Did You Know? In the first 10 days of the North Bay fire, we posted 390 stories about the fire. And they were shared nearly 137,000 times.
Already a subscriber?
iPhone
Supporting the community that supports us.
Obviously you value quality local journalism. Thank you.
Already a subscriber?
iPhone
Oops, you're out of free articles.
We miss you already! (Subscriptions start at just 99 cents.)
Already a subscriber?
iPhone
X

The "Follow This Story" feature will notify you when any articles related to this story are posted.

When you follow a story, the next time a related article is published — it could be days, weeks or months — you'll receive an email informing you of the update.

If you no longer want to follow a story, click the "Unfollow" link on that story. There's also an "Unfollow" link in every email notification we send you.

This tool is available only to subscribers; please make sure you're logged in if you want to follow a story.

Login

X

Please note: This feature is available only to subscribers; make sure you're logged in if you want to follow a story.

LoginSubscribe

If You Go

What: Joan Baez, ‘Fare Thee Well Tour’

When: 7 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 11

Where: Weill Hall at the Green Music Center, Sonoma State University, 1801 E. Cotati Ave., Rohnert Park

Admission: Sold out

Information: gmc.sonoma.edu, 866-955-6040

The Joan Baez “Fare Thee Well” tour, which started in Europe last year and ends next year, doesn’t mean the iconic folksinger is saying farewell forever to live performances.

But the current tour, which will bring her Sunday, Nov. 11, to a sold-out show at Green Music Center, does mean goodbye to full-scale touring.

“I plan on singing when I want to sing,” said Baez, who turned 77 in January. “There’s a difference between that and bumping along for six weeks in a tour bus, which I also love, but is that what I want to be doing when I’m 77 years old?”

It’s a choice each performer must make, she said. “Pete Seeger sang until his 90s and his voice was shot but it didn’t matter,” Baez said. “It was about what he had to say and teach.”

While Baez hasn’t reached that point in her own career, she will say it takes more time and effort now to get her voice into shape for a performance tour.

In March, Baez released a new studio album, “Whistle Down the Wind,” which is her first in 10 years and quite possibly her last.

“It’s probably the last one, and I say that because I really can’t imagine putting together another album. I mean, talk about work! It’s really hard work, and there’s nothing in my consciousness, in view, on the horizon or anything. I’m really happy with this one,” she said.

“I’m not saying it’s the last album, because at some point, something might trigger a special album, or one more special project,” Baez added. “But I really do not anticipate making another album.”

So what will she do?

“You know, we had two weeks off a little while ago, and I actually did a lot of nothing, which is a big challenge for me, because I’m a doer,” said Baez, who lives in Woodside. “To sit down and stop, or watch a movie at two o’clock in the afternoon is just absolutely unheard of, so those are like exercises in how do I handle my life when I’m not super busy.”

Baez continues to paint portraits, which she began doing roughly seven years ago. Last year, 14 works in her “Mischief Makers” series — featuring paintings of Bob Dylan, the Dalai Lama, Martin Luther King Jr. and others — were donated to the Sonoma State University with funds from the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria.

“When I get into painting, I don’t really want to do anything else,” she said. “The other thing, though, is I’m making a documentary film of my life. That’s taking a lot of time, too. And it will be something that I’m really deeply involved in, and it will talk about stuff that I’ve never talked before, because it’s time.”

Baez does expect some post-tour depression and characteristically, she isn’t afraid of facing some even bigger issues.

“I’ll probably have moments of really deep sorrow,” she said. “It’s also time to start thinking about death. You know, we’re so allergic to it. But I’m up to a time where I really ought to give it a whole lot more thought and hang out with a bunch of Buddhists, because they seem to be the only ones who know how to deal with it.”

If You Go

What: Joan Baez, ‘Fare Thee Well Tour’

When: 7 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 11

Where: Weill Hall at the Green Music Center, Sonoma State University, 1801 E. Cotati Ave., Rohnert Park

Admission: Sold out

Information: gmc.sonoma.edu, 866-955-6040

For anyone who has followed her career and public life, it’ll come as no surprise that Baez continues to speak out about the nation’s current political foment and social strife.

“I wrote a little speech to give from the stage, because things are such a mess, and there was a standing ovation. People want to hear something that’s kind, or not ugly or not cruel,” she said.

The speech begins with this passage: “We must be a sanctuary. We must say, ‘You’re safe here: gay, trans, lesbian, black, brown, white, native, yellow, disabled, sick, hurt, homeless, refugees, immigrants. You are safe here in this world, which is plummeting out of control, this country which is a crumbling democracy, this place where lies are more prevalent than truth. You are safe here.’”

You can reach staff writer Dan Taylor at 707-521-5243 or dan.taylor@pressdemocrat.com. On Twitter @danarts.

Show Comment