s
s
Sections
Search
We don't just cover the North Bay. We live here.
Did You Know? In the first 10 days of the North Bay fire, nearly 1.5 million people used their mobile devices to visit our sites.
Already a subscriber?
iPhone
Wow! You read a lot!
Reading enhances confidence, empathy, decision-making, and overall life satisfaction. Keep it up! Subscribe.
Already a subscriber?
iPhone
Oops, you're out of free articles.
Until next month, you can always look over someone's shoulder at the coffee shop.
Already a subscriber?
iPhone
We don't just cover the North Bay. We live here.
Did You Know? In the first 10 days of the North Bay fire, we posted 390 stories about the fire. And they were shared nearly 137,000 times.
Already a subscriber?
iPhone
Supporting the community that supports us.
Obviously you value quality local journalism. Thank you.
Already a subscriber?
iPhone
Oops, you're out of free articles.
We miss you already! (Subscriptions start at just 99 cents.)
Already a subscriber?
iPhone
X

The "Follow This Story" feature will notify you when any articles related to this story are posted.

When you follow a story, the next time a related article is published — it could be days, weeks or months — you'll receive an email informing you of the update.

If you no longer want to follow a story, click the "Unfollow" link on that story. There's also an "Unfollow" link in every email notification we send you.

This tool is available only to subscribers; please make sure you're logged in if you want to follow a story.

Login

X

Please note: This feature is available only to subscribers; make sure you're logged in if you want to follow a story.

LoginSubscribe

Ginny asks: Will a little Leaf Linden tree grow in our area?

Yes, Tillia cordata will grow in our area, and has many fine attributes. It is a deciduous tree that will reach a height of l8 to 22 feet after l0 years. And as a mature tree under ideal growing conditions, it can reach a height of 70 feet and 50 feet in width. Keep these sizes in mind before planting!

Since it will accept many soil types, and we do have many soil types in our county, it makes a good street tree planted in sunny exposures or in partial shade in a back yard. Its creamy yellow flowers attract pollinators.

There are different forms/ canopy shapes available that will fit in any landscape.

The variety named “Corinthian” is narrow; “Greenspire” is more oval in shape. “Shamrock” is symmetrical. There also is a dwarf, ‘Summer Sprite’, that reaches a mature height of 20 feet and 10 feet in width. “Summer Sprite” is perfect for the smaller landscape and/or patio area.

Evie writes: I saw a lovely floral design at a recent flower show that included large ivy-like plant material with colorful variations of dark and lighter greens on the leaves. I was told the plant was Fatshedera.

What can you tell me about its growth habits, invasiveness, cultural requirements (sun, water), etc.?

any additional information would be appreciated.

Fatshedera x lizei is an evergreen shrub or vine that is a hybrid (“x”) between a Japanese aralia and an English ivy. Its large ivy-like leaves are a stunning dark-green with blotches of yellow-green in the leaf centers. This particular variety is ‘Lemon and Lime’

Fatshedera doesn’t have the ivy growth habit but it can sprawl on the ground or be used as an espaliered vine attached to a strong support.

Tip prune it for fuller growth and if used as a ground sprawler, cut back new vertical growth every 2 to 3 weeks. It can be cut back to the ground and will readily come back looking better than ever.

Cheryl Feurborn, an award-winning floral designer and flower judge, grows Fatshedera in her extensive home garden and reports it is not invasive like English ivy and is an excellent addition to her garden and floral designs.

Barbara K. asks: What is the name of the numerous caterpillars that are crawling under the north facing eaves of my house? They are black with red stripes and little spikes and hairs running along their body. I don’t see any “cases” built at this time.

On closer inspection, the caterpillars are called Mourning Cloak, whose larvae will soon transform into beautiful Mourning Cloak butterflies. You have a creek behind your property that has willows, a perfect habitat for these particular caterpillars. Butterflies will overwinter in woodpiles or in nooks of crannies of buildings, such as the eaves, before laying their clusters of eggs in April when the weather gets warmer. The eggs are laid on the willow host plants, hatch into caterpillars, enjoy feeding and then form a pupa or chrysalis. The chrysalis is brown. Perhaps you will see them hanging from your eaves? (FYI, moth’s pupa are called cocoons.)

Here is their life cycle: Eggs 4 – 14 days, larvae 3 to 4 weeks, chrysalis 7 to 18 days. When the adult butterfly emerges it may live as long as 10 months. The adult is distinctive with its yellow edges and bluish dots along the inside edge of the yellow edges.

Sonoma Women in Conversation

When: 4-8:30 p.m. Sept. 26

Where: The Green Music Center, 1801 E. Cotati Ave., Rohnert Park

Highlights: 4-6:30 p.m. is The Experience, an expo with a chance to mingle, dine from food trucks, view demonstrations and learn about women-related businesses. The Conversation, which includes Jaycee Dugard and Dr. Tererai Trent, a writer and advocate for womens empowerment and education, is from 6:30-8:30 p.m.

Cost: $10 for The Experience only, $58 for The Experience and The Conversation. Tickets can be purchased at socowomenevents.com

Gene W. asks: Do you know the name of a fruit picking apron or “bucket bag”? I am tired of picking fruit, balancing on a ladder while holding a bucket!

There is a product called a Roo Apron that is used for harvesting vegetables and fruit. Look for a product that has an apron pouch that easily releases the harvest and the fabric is strong enough to carry some weight.

Dana Lozano and Gwen Kilchherr are garden consultants. Send your gardening questions to The Garden Doctors, at pdgardendoctor@gmail.com. The Garden Doctors can answer questions only through their column, which appears twice a month in the newspaper and online at pressdemocrat.com.

Show Comment